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The East Dulwich Forum
Which pubs, bars, restaurants and take-aways do you avoid?
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messageLearned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 15 September, 2009 10:03

comport

As in '... But Judge Jed Rakoff refused to sign off the settlement, which he said “does not comport with the most elementary notions of justice and morality” ...'

Verb
Formal
1. comport oneself - to behave in a specified way
2. comport with - to suit or be appropriate to [Latin comportare to collect]

Noun
A large, covered glass bowl on a stem, which can be used as a serving piece for compotes
(see [www.replacements.com] and updated post on page 4)



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit was 2012:10:19:10:55:31 by silverfox.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by computedshorty 15 September, 2009 10:36

?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was 2010:01:13:11:24:16 by computedshorty.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 15 September, 2009 11:08

There seems to be quite a wide band of definitions for it.

com·port (km-pôrt, -prt)
v. com·port·ed, com·port·ing, com·ports
v.tr.
To conduct or behave (oneself) in a particular manner: Comport yourself with dignity.
v.intr.
To agree, correspond, or harmonize: a foreign policy that comports with the principles of democracy.

[Middle English comporten, from Old French comporter, to conduct, from Latin comportre, to bring together : com-, com- + portre, to carry; see per-2 in Indo-European roots.]

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2009. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by LuLu Too 15 September, 2009 21:15

We had Comportment classes in my school.
The nuns attempt at making proper young ladies of us.

Failed in my case.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 15 September, 2009 21:22

Ah, I've heard of Deportment classes but not Comportment

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by LuLu Too 15 September, 2009 21:27

It was definately comportment. It was drilled in to us, especially when in uniform!
But the two are indeed very similiar

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 15 September, 2009 21:39

Perhaps deportment is more about how one stands, moves etc (book on head while walking) and comportment is about behaviour, conduct, etiquette?

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by citizenED 15 September, 2009 22:28

I like the word comport: it'll be added to my vocab. henceforth.

I came accross another new word recently. Take a look at this report of Serena William's recent outburst:

According to the Grand Slam Rule Book, unsportsmanlike conduct when referred to the Grand Slam committee can be treated as "aggravated behaviour", which "is flagrant and particularly injurious to the success of a Grand Slam, or is singularly egregious".

"egregious" in a set of sporting rules; now that is class.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 16 September, 2009 10:16

Just came across another word today that is new to me (but maybe not to the erudite and French speaking members of the Forum).

Roué

As in: "Alan Clark, the notorious parliamentarian and roué, left behind a cache of explosive material for his biographer, Ion Trewin"


rou·é [ roo áy ] (plural rou·és)

noun

Definition:

debauched man: a man who regularly engages in drinking, gambling, and womanizing ( literary )


[Early 19th century. < French< past participle of rouer "break on the wheel" (a medieval instrument of torture) < Latin rotare (see rotate)]

Word History

The term roué is thought to stem from Philip, duke of Orléans and regent of France (1715-1723), who humorously designated his debauched companions as roués, either to suggest that they deserved to be broken upon the wheel or because their behaviour was so exhausting that they felt they had undergone this torture.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by SteveT 16 September, 2009 12:38

Roué debauched man: a man who regularly engages in drinking, gambling, and womanizing


2nd definition:- Man having fun and being himself IE. not being controlled by a good wife.

--------------------
dickensman

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by SeanMacGabhann 16 September, 2009 14:09

And to think some people call you chivalrous, Steve...

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by SteveT 16 September, 2009 22:36

Who?

First I've heard of it.

Anyway I always wanted to be infamous, it's always sounded much more exciting than being chivalrous Sean.

It's rather like a woman you fancy telling her best friend that you're 'nice'.

You will never get under the covers with her with that unfavourable description.

--------------------
dickensman

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Moos 17 September, 2009 11:33

That's all right Steve, based on your last couple of posts I don't think you're in any danger.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by mockney piers 17 September, 2009 14:47

cromulent :
(crôm-yü-lənt)
1. (adj.) Being well-formed; legitimate; of a word, especially a neologism, that is not previously attested in the language but obeys its rules of word-formation.
 
As in 'under the circumstances his offtopication is perfectly cromulent'

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Peckhamgatecrasher 17 September, 2009 14:48

Reckon you're making that one up. Never heard of it!

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by mockney piers 17 September, 2009 14:55

Wasn't me guvnor. Clearly you're too high brow PGC, aim lower.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Brendan 17 September, 2009 15:24

Is indignance a perfectly cromulent word then?

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by mockney piers 17 September, 2009 15:31

It wasn't meant to come across like that, perhaps I should embiggen my sense of humour.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Brendan 17 September, 2009 15:38

No I wasn’t suggesting that you were being indignant or indeed possessing any indignance.

I was just applying the rules to noun which is oft’ considered incorrect.

I see you have been on the same website as me.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by HAL9000 17 September, 2009 15:46

Duh! I've just read that the word cromulent itself is incromulent!

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by mockney piers 17 September, 2009 15:47

Oh I see as opposed to indignation. I guess it falls within the bounds of cromulence, though equally it could just he incorrect.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Brendan 17 September, 2009 16:00

Would colloquial usage cromulise it?

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by HAL9000 17 September, 2009 16:33

Hmmm. Wouldn't that only embiggen cromulent's cromularity?

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Brendan 17 September, 2009 16:39

I think I’m incorrect. Cromulance isn’t reliant on usage.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Moos 17 September, 2009 16:42

I've just used the word discombobulation without bothering to look it up first, and wonder whether it might mean becoming less like *Bob*.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Brendan 17 September, 2009 16:46

discombobulation - An embarrassing feeling that leaves a person confused.

You know there may be something in that Moos.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by mockney piers 17 September, 2009 16:47

If the above definition is correct the cromulance of a neolgism is lost the moment it neologosity has ceased and it has entered into everyday usage.

Is offtopicate still cromulent or has it become accepted in this here community. In fact does colloquial acceptance give rise to a local loss of cromulence but mean it can still maintain it elsewhere?

In fact has the mere fact that The Simpsons coined it invalidated the cromulence of both cromulent and embiggen?

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by mockney piers 17 September, 2009 16:50

Is it something to do with fearing that He* has permanently left us?

**Bob*

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Brendan 17 September, 2009 16:52

Yes it has. What occurred is a process known (or not known perhaps) as Simpsonulisation.

They are now Simpsonulisationisms.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by HAL9000 17 September, 2009 16:56

Wouldn't that be a circular argument in the case of a self-referencing neologism such a cromulent?

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