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messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by mockney piers 17 September, 2009 17:16

Of course that isn't necessarily the definitive definition, but agreed it is a bit head bending.

Im liking brendans new word though think 'Simpsonulisms' works a bit better. Do they extend to neologisms from any tv programme, only animated programs or from anything thats embraced by all who are a bit geeky.

I'm not saying I'm alot like comic book guy, I'm not saying that at all.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Moos 17 September, 2009 17:20

Mockers, comic guy could be put into a sausage machine and come out as 4 Mockerses.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by mockney piers 17 September, 2009 17:42

True, bt the essence wild he true in all four.

Is a definitive definition tautologous? Is a definition err by definition definitive?

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Moos 17 September, 2009 17:51

No idea what the first sentence means.

Re: your 2nd - Yes. Definitely.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Brendan 17 September, 2009 18:09

I disagree. Definitive and definition are derivative of definite but not definitive definitions thereof.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Brendan 17 September, 2009 18:10

Or were you sugestiong that a definitive definition has something to do with bulls?

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Moos 17 September, 2009 18:24

I suppose if you can have a vague definition then a definitive definition is also possible.

True, bt the essence wild he true in all four.

There's a sort of beauty to this sentence, one can imagine scholars stroking their beards and gently pondering possible meanings.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Brendan 17 September, 2009 19:14

Perhaps a line out of a long lost Shakespearian play about a phone engineer with 4 sons.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Peckhamgatecrasher 19 September, 2009 08:18


messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by SteveT 19 September, 2009 08:33

Moos wrote:- True, bt the essence wild he true in all four.

There's a sort of beauty to this sentence, one can imagine scholars stroking their beards and gently pondering possible meanings.




Or perhaps stroking their beards whilst attempting to define what his drug regime was when he penned it.

--------------------
dickensman

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 19 September, 2009 12:30

Peckhamgatecrasher Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
put this on your Christmas list Silverfox!

Wow, thanks for that Peckhamgatecrasher, Christmas has come early for me and you've certainly got my measure!

The words fornale, to spend one’s money before it has been earned; cagg, a solemn vow or resolution not to get drunk for a certain time; shot clog, an Elizabethan term for a drinking companion only tolerated because he pays for the round certainly sum me up while deipnosophist, a Jacobean word for a skillful dinner conversationalist, only in my dreams.

I'm feeling a bit crambazzled this morning but enjoyed your present.

PS, are you a stridewallop?

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Peckhamgatecrasher 19 September, 2009 12:47

Describes me perfectly.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 19 September, 2009 15:49

Right, I'm off to join the twacks on Norcross Road and Lordship Lane. (See Peckhamgatecrasher's post for definition)

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by The Chair 21 September, 2009 14:24

This thread made a promising start, but unless someone returns it to the straight and narrow pretty soon, then off to the Lounge it goes!

--------------------
>>THE CHAIR<<

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Brendan 21 September, 2009 14:39

Prosopopoeia

A rhetorical device in which a speaker or writer communicates to the audience by speaking as another person or object.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Peckhamgatecrasher 21 September, 2009 14:51

Dissever

Appears in Porphyria's Lover and means to separate; divide into parts.


[Note to self - don't read daughter's homework and cobble an answer.]

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 21 September, 2009 15:11

gyve

As in "The Chair will gyve us if we don't behave"


gyve [ jîv ]

noun (plural gyves)

Definition:

leg shackle: a shackle or fetter, usually for the leg ( usually used in the plural )


transitive verb (past and past participle gyved, present participle gyv·ing, 3rd person present singular gyves)

Definition:

shackle: to shackle or fetter somebody, especially by the leg

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 03 October, 2009 13:42

According to today's Daily Mail we all know that the longest word in the English language is
Floccinaucinihili-pilification, meaning inconsiderable or trifling. I didn't.

Floccinaucinihili-pilification (Pronunciation flok-suh-naw-suh-nahy-hil-uh-pil-uh-fi-key-shuhn]

Noun: the estimation of something as worthless, or the habit of doing so.

It has even spawned the back formations floccinaucical "inconsiderable, trifling" and floccinaucity "a matter of small consequence".

Usage
The first known written instance of floccinaucinihilipilification, as recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary, is in 1741, in a published letter by William Shenstone. The quotation is: "I loved him for nothing so much as his flocci-nauci-nihili-pili-fication of money." Other notable users of the word have included Robert Southey (in the Quarterly Review 14:334, 1816), and Walter Scott (Journal 18, 1829). Scott, however, replaced the "nauci" component with "pauci".

The feminine noun construction, floccinaucinihilipilificatrix, can be found in the Robert A. Heinlein novel The Number of the Beast.

On July 20, 1999, during the (ultimately failed) ratification process of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) in the U.S. Senate, North Carolina Senator and Foreign Relations Committee chairman Jesse Helms, an ardent opponent of the treaty, in response to 45 Democrats asking him to allow hearings on the treaty, left little doubt that he was enjoying his role as a spoiler when he wrote "I note your distress at my floccinaucinihilipilification of the CTBT [but] I do not share your enthusiasm for this treaty for a variety of reasons."


Word Origin & History

floccinaucinihilipilification

"action or habit of estimating as worthless," 1741, a combination of four Latin words (flocci, nauci, nihili, pilifi) all signifying "at a small price" or "for nothing," found in a section of the Eton Latin Grammar. The word is said to have been invented as an erudite joke by a student of Eton College, who found in his textbook four ways of saying "don't care" and combined them:

flocci facere (from floccus, -i a wisp or piece of wool)
nauci facere (from naucum, -i a trifle)
nihili facere (from nihilum, -i nothing; something valueless (lit. "not even a thread" from ni+hilum)) Example being: "nihilism"
pili facere (from pilus, -i a hair; a bit or a whit; something small and insignificant)

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by ££££ 03 October, 2009 16:37

silverfox Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> gyve
>
> As in "The Chair will gyve us if we don't behave"
>
>
>
> gyve [ jîv ]
>
> noun (plural gyves)
>
> Definition:
>
> leg shackle: a shackle or fetter, usually for the
> leg ( usually used in the plural )
>
>
> transitive verb (past and past participle gyved,
> present participle gyv·ing, 3rd person present
> singular gyves)
>
> Definition:
>
> shackle: to shackle or fetter somebody, especially
> by the leg

Funny old noun?

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 03 October, 2009 17:22

I think you've misread this ££££.

I've given examples of both noun and transitive verb.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by ££££ 03 October, 2009 23:00

Apologies - will teach me to read the whole post before commenting...maybe winking smiley

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 11 October, 2009 15:38

futz  (Pronunciation fuhts)

As in "Futzing with the stratosphere?

Verb
Infinitive to futz

verb - (used without object)
to pass time in idleness (usually fol. by around). To be frivolous and waste time. To experiment by trial and error

Verb phrase - futz with or around with, to handle or deal with, esp. idly, reluctantly, or as a time-consuming task: I spent all day futzing with those file folders.

(third-person singular simple present futzes, present participle futzing, simple past and past participle futzed)

noun - a fool; simpleton.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 03 November, 2009 09:55

Yotta

As in:

"Mr Chiscolm sued Bank of America in Manhattan's federal court ... for "$1,784 billion trillion", in a complaint that boiled down to poor customer service".

The actual number, 1,784 billion trillion, is equal to 1.784 multiplied by 10 to the 24th power, or 1,784 followed by 21 zeroes.

Using the International System of Units, this number is called a Yotta.

International System of Units

Kilo (K) = 3 zeroes
Mega (M) = 6 zeroes
Giga (G) = 9 zeroes
Tera (T) = 12 zeroes
Peta (P) = 15 zeroes
Exa (E) = 18 zeroes
Zetta (Z) = 21 zeroes
Yotta (Y) = 24 zeroes



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was 2009:11:03:10:00:27 by silverfox.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 04 November, 2009 10:38

Googolplex

Following on from Yotta, above, the word Googolplex came up on last night's Horizon programme about blackholes.

As in: "In a separate article, Page shows that the number of states in a black hole with a mass roughly equivalent to the Andromeda Galaxy is in the range of a googolplex."

A googol is a number equal to 10 to the power of 100 (ie, a 1 with 100 zeros following it). Written out explicitly,

10000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000.

A googolplex is the number 10 raised to the power of a googol of zeros.

1 googolplex
=10 to the power of
10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,
000,000,000,000,000

One googol is also presumed to be greater than the number of hydrogen atoms in the observable universe. Carl Sagan estimated that writing a googolplex in numerals (i.e., "10,000,000,000...") would be physically impossible, since doing so would require more space than the known universe occupies.

Yet, much larger still is Graham's Number perhaps the largest natural number mathematicians actually ever talk about.

(Edited as the posted page didn't reproduce the raised power symbols properly)



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit was 2009:11:04:10:46:58 by silverfox.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by steveo 10 November, 2009 13:29

Palimpsest is a good one isn't it?

OK delete that

Palimpsest is good isn't it?



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was 2009:11:10:13:33:53 by steveo.

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 01 January, 2010 22:42

Paraskavedekatriaphobia

Noun
paraskavedekatriaphobia

Fear of Friday the 13th.

Etymology
From Friday + thirteen + -phobia

Derived words
•paraskavedekatriaphobic

and

Polydactyl

Being born with additional digits (fingers/toes)

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 18 February, 2010 11:22

Actually I didn't learn a new word today. Can anyone help as there's alot of people on the web confused over this one?

spuripeopleous

Appears in today's Daily Mail in an article about the government wasting money on climate change propaganda. It's been coined by Matthew Sinclair, the TaxPayers’ Alliance research director, who is quoted as saying:

‘Despite a fortune having been spent on these projects, the fund has failed even on its own spuripeopleous terms. It is infuriating for taxpayers to see their money squandered on attempts to scare and indoctrinate the public.’

[www.dailymail.co.uk]

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by Huguenot 18 February, 2010 13:26

I'm guessing the correspondent was using a laptop with a track pad.

As he hit the spacebar after the word spurious in order to insertt 'people' he inadvertently tapped the trackpad with his thumb, thus moving the insertion point to wherever the cursor was hovering - in this case over the middle of spurious.

I'm guessing he was using a content management system (CMS) for the Mail website that was accessed through a browser. Because he chose Internet Explorer, there was no spell-check to correct his error.

Thus 'spuripeopleous' could be defined as "an inputting error from a short-sighted right-winger".

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 18 February, 2010 13:32

Yep, it must be a mistake. Worrying though that the subeditors didn't spot it. Whatever happened to journalistic standards?

messageRe: Learned a new word today
Posted by silverfox 22 February, 2010 13:42

Lycra-lout

Noun.

A derogatory term applied to the estimated 20% of cyclists who flout the highway code.

Word coined on BBC London News this lunchtime.

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