Forum Sponsors

www.takeflightacademy.co.uk
xxxx
www.lorenzophotography.co.uk

All Round Renovation

Advertise here

The East Dulwich Forum
Which pubs, bars, restaurants and take-aways do you avoid?
Goto Page: Previous1234567891011Next
Current Page: 6 of 11
messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by overcaffeinated 16 August, 2016 20:23

Neither Holly nor I can make it - sorry! She's stuck at work and I'm knackered sad smiley

I vote for P45 and diary of a nobody; Holly votes for P45 and Samuel Pepys.

See you next month.

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by kennethw 16 August, 2016 22:54

The choice for next month is....The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, and we picked 13 September as a date, so see you all at the Tippler at 8pm.

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by susan_ 12 September, 2016 20:49

Looking forward to tomorrow evening - see you there about 7:45!

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by overcaffeinated 12 September, 2016 22:25

Hi all - I won't make it as it's my pre-mat leave work drinks. Sorry! Hopefully see you next month... We'll see smiling smiley

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by Red_Cat 13 September, 2016 00:20

Hi All,

Here is the book list for this month, based, loosely, on the theme of 'Sport'

London Fields - Martin Amis
London Fields is a black comic, murder mystery. The murderee - Nicola Six - is searching for something and someone: her murderer. She knows the time, she knows the place, she knows the motive, she knows the means. She just doesn't know the man. London Fields is a brilliant, funny, multi-layered novel. It is a book in which the narrator, Samson Young, enters the Black Cross, a thoroughly undesirable public house, and finds the main players of his drama assembled, just waiting to begin. It's a gift of a story from real life... all Samson has to do is write it as it happens. The novel proceeds on the basis that the lying and cheating Keith Talent, known criminal and aspiring professional darts player, gearing up to play in the Sparrow Masters darts final, will kill Nicola...


Murder Must Advertise - Dorothy Sayers
Victor Dean fell to his death on the stairs of Pym's Adverising Agency, but no-one seems to be sorry. Until an inquisitive new copywriter joins the firm and asks some awkward questions... Disguised as his disreputable cousin Death Bredon, Lord Peter Wimsey takes a job - one that soon draws him into a vicious network of blackmailers and drug pedlars. Five people will die before Wimsey unravels a sinister deadly plot, with a game of cricket playing a pivotal role in the proceedings, from nearly blowing Wimsey's cover to handing him the final clue which is masterfully woven into the action.


Piccadilly Jim - PG Wodehouse
Beautiful young red head, Ann Chester, plots to kidnap her irritating cousin with the help of a former boxer, her uncle, and a rogue who has his eye on her. Society rabble-rouser and tabloid favourite Jimmy Crocker falls very much in love with Ann but nothing works out exactly as planned as criminals, detectives and cases of mistaken identity get in the way. In a dizzying plot that rivals Shakespeare for characters pretending to be others, impersonations pile on impersonations so that (for reasons that do become clear)Jimmy ends up having to spend a considerable portion of the book pretending to be himself. Endlessly good-humoured with a sparky heroine and a likeable hero, Piccadilly Jim is one of Wodehouse's most renowmed comic novels

Unseen Academicals - Terry Pratchett
Football has come to the ancient city of Ankh-Morpork. And now, the wizards of Unseen University must win a football match, without using magic, so they're in the mood for trying everything else. This is not going to be a gentleman's game. The prospect of the Big Match draws in a street urchin with a wonderful talent for kicking a tin can, a maker of jolly good pies, a dim but beautiful young woman and the mysterious Mt Nutt. As the match approaches, four lives are entangled and changed forever. Behind the fantasy Terry Pratchett looks at very real contemporary issues, satirical, historical, fantastical and irresistible

The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner - Alan Sillitoe
The title story in this classic collection tells of Smith, a defiant young rebel, inhabiting the no-man's land of institutionalised Borstal where he discovers a talent for long-distance running. This brings him to the notice of the Governor and he is entered into a race, one he could quite easily win, but chooses to deliberately lose. A ground breaking work, it captured the grim isolation of the working class in the English Midlands of the 1960's. Sillitoes's depiction of petty crime and deep-seated anger in industrial and desperate cities remains as potent today as it was almost half a century ago

Nana - Emile Zola
In the waning years of the French Second Empire, French prostitute Nana Coupeau rises from the streets to the heights of clandenstine French society by virtue of her performance as the lead in a fictional operetta. While her performance is terrible, her sex appeal and magnetism win over the audience. Subsequently Nana, despite the fact she can neither sing nor dance, becomes a star of the Varieties and the toast of Paris. When one of Nana's aspiring lovers runs two horses in the Grand Prix de Paris, Nana shows up to the race dressed in her lover's stable colours and displayed in an ornate carriage drawn by four white horses. A frenzy of gambling, gossiping and showing off ensues, in which it is discovered that no one has bet on the filly named for Nana. When the filly wins the triumph leads to a wild evening of celebrations, but ultimately ends in diaster. A totally engaging, ripping yarn about the rise and fall of a beautiful courtesan in Paris in the 1870's



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit was 2016:09:13:00:23:26 by Red_Cat.

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by LadyBird1977 16 September, 2016 21:18

Hello,

I'll be moving back to East Dulwich in late October and would like to join a book club, are you taking new members? I saw in the original thread it said just to buy the book and then turn up, is that still the case?

Thanks for the advice, Ashley

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by Red_Cat 16 September, 2016 23:19

Hi Ashley yes the book club is open to new members, next meeting by the way is 18th October, book is The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner. We normally sit through the back on the left, hope to see you there.

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by LadyBird1977 17 September, 2016 09:01

Hello, thanks for getting back to me.

I won't quite be back then, my move date is 24th. So I guess I'll come along in November. Should I follow the thread to find out what the next book will be? And what time do you meet?

Thanks again, Ashley

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by susan_ 17 September, 2016 16:51

Hi Ashley,
We meet at 7:45 for an 8 pm start in the Tippler.

I suggest you click the 'Follow this Thread' link (just below this post) and you'll receive an email when there is a new post. We don't tend to put much up on the thread except book lists and details of the next meet- up

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by Red_Cat 17 October, 2016 21:03

Just a reminder for tomorrow's meeting 7:45 for 8 at House of Tippler!

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by overcaffeinated 18 October, 2016 13:13

Hi all - sadly I'm going to miss this month too; my mum is visiting (I was due on Friday... nothing yet!). Nov seems unlikely but hopefully I'll see you all again in Dec or Jan!

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by kennethw 20 October, 2016 12:41

Hello Everyone, we had a good meeting this week, I volunteered to do a list for the next meeting, which will be at Tippler on 15 November at 7.45 for 8. smiling smiley We didn't manage a selection process this week, so if you post here we can pick the winner that way.

Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - Robert Louis Stevenson 46pp
A good man takes a potion that turns him into a freak of pure evil. A reasonable scientist is transformed - through the agency of science itself - into the living embodiment of unreason.

The Fall of the House of Usher - Edgar Allen Poe 50pp
A visitor to a gloomy mansion finds a childhood friend dying under the spell of a family curse. Roderick Usher’s fate is inextricably intertwined with that of his sister, Madeline, and that of their estate. As one falls, so do they all.

The Turn of the Screw - Henry James 80pp
An anonymous narrator recalls a Christmas Eve gathering at an old house, where guests listen to one another’s ghost stories. A guest named Douglas introduces a story that involves two children—Flora and Miles—and his sister’s governess, with whom he was in love.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was 2016:10:20:12:44:26 by kennethw.

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by overcaffeinated 20 October, 2016 14:18

Ooh this throws anonymous voting out of the window! Controversial smiling smiley

Good list, I like the sound of all three. I vote for House of Usher and Jekyll and Hyde.

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by susan_ 20 October, 2016 14:24

Ditto - I've recently read Jekyll and Hyde so I vote for House of Usher and Turn of the Screw

Thanks Kenneth!

Did someone volunteer for the December/January list? If not I'd be happy to do it.

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by Red_Cat 20 October, 2016 14:31

Ive read them all cos i like that kind of stuff but Jekyll and Hyde we've already done before in bookclub so I'm voting for the other two.
1. House of usher
2. Turn of the Screw

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by kennethw 20 October, 2016 14:36

Sorry, I should have asked people to PM me. My votes would be for House of Usher and Dr Jekyll.

Currently

Jekyll - 2
Usher - 3
Screw - 1

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by sparklehorse 24 October, 2016 12:58

Hello, great list. I will be on holiday for this one though, so I will abstain ... Have a lovely time.

E

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by hollyt 24 October, 2016 13:16

I vote for Screw and Usher, do we have a date for this?

Holly x

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by Red_Cat 24 October, 2016 20:30

Holly it's the 15th November

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by marlowe 26 October, 2016 15:59

I vote for The Fall of the House of Usher - Edgar Allen Po. I've read the other 2.

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by marlowe 01 November, 2016 11:37

Have we decided on a book yet?

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by kennethw 01 November, 2016 11:40

From the votes, the Fall of the House of Usher is a clear winner, so we'll pick that and see you all on the 15th.

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by susan_ 01 November, 2016 12:03

Yea - I really like Poe!

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by JenniferJ 07 November, 2016 15:19

Missed a few bookclubs due to work and life stuff but will pop along on the 15th. See you then.

Jen xx

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by susan_ 10 November, 2016 21:21

Hi bookclubbers - I'm going to have to make a short-notice trip to see family next week so I won't be able to come to book club on the 15th! I will still do the list for next time. I think last year we sort of skipped December or had two months to read the January book (given December is crazy busy for many people). Any thoughts of doing this again?

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by Red_Cat 15 November, 2016 19:11

Not sure if I make it tonight, have to work late, liked spooky house of usher!

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by kennethw 16 November, 2016 12:04

We had a good night last night, even managed to speak about the House of Usher for a bit, which we liked enough to wish it had been a bit longer.

We didn't set a date for December, or agree a list topic, so I guess I'll hand over to Susan for that one. smiling smiley

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by susan_ 17 November, 2016 10:36

Hi all, sorry about the lateness of the list. My mom is rather more poorly than I expected so is taking all my focus. I do have an idea for the list but it will take me a week or so to assemble and post here. Bear with me smiling smiley

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by susan_ 28 November, 2016 12:58

Okay - at long last, here's my list and proposal for next meeting:

Let's meet on the second Tuesday of January - 10th January at 7:45 for 8pm start.

Below are 5 books by Julian Barnes, a British writer I've never read - I ran across his newest novel when searching for inspiration and thought it might be interesting to pick from a list of his writings. He's been shortlisted for the Booker Prize three times, including winning it in 2011. Please PM me with your votes by 5 December and I'll tot up the winner and post it here.

Arthur & George
Arthur and George grow up worlds apart in late nineteenth-century Britain: Arthur in shabby-genteel Edinburgh, George in the vicarage of a small Staffordshire village. Arthur is to become one of the most famous men of his age, while George remains in hard-working obscurity. But as the new century begins, they are brought together by a sequence of events that made sensational headlines at the time as The Great Wyrley Outrages.
This is a novel about low crime and high spirituality, guilt and innocence, identity, nationality and race. Most of all it is a profound and moving meditation on the fateful differences between what we believe, what we know and what we can prove.

Flaubert's Parrot
Flaubert's Parrot deals with Flaubert, parrots, bears and railways; with our sense of the past and our sense of abroad; with France and England, life and art, sex and death, George Sand and Louise Colet, aesthetics and redcurrant jam; and with its enigmatic narrator, a retired English doctor, whose life and secrets are slowly revealed.
A compelling weave of fiction and imaginatively ordered fact, Flaubert's Parrot is by turns moving and entertaining, witty and scholarly, and a tour de force of seductive originality.

The Sense of an Ending
Tony Webster and his clique first met Adrian Finn at school. Sex-hungry and book-hungry, they would navigate the girl-less sixth form together, trading in affectations, in-jokes, rumour and wit. Maybe Adrian was a little more serious than the others, certainly more intelligent, but they all swore to stay friends for life.
Now Tony is retired. He's had a career and a single marriage, a calm divorce. He's certainly never tried to hurt anybody. Memory, though, is imperfect. It can always throw up surprises, as a lawyer's letter is about to prove.

A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters
Beginning with an unlikely stowaway's account of life on board Noah's Ark, A History of the World in 10˝ Chapters presents a surprising and subversive fictional-history of earth told from several kaleidoscopic perspectives. Noah disembarks from his ark but he and his Voyage are not forgotten: they are revisited in on other centuries and other climes - by a Victorian spinster mourning her father, by an American astronaut on an obsessive personal mission. We journey to the Titanic, to the Amazon, to the raft of the Medusa, and to an ecclesiastical court in medieval France where a bizarre case is about to begin...
This is no ordinary history, but something stranger; a challenge and a delight for the reader's imagination. Ambitious yet accessible, witty and playfully serious, this is the work of a brilliant novelist.

Levels of Life
In Levels of Life Julian Barnes gives us Nadar, the pioneer balloonist and aerial photographer; he gives us Colonel Fred Burnaby, reluctant adorer of the extravagant Sarah Bernhardt; then, finally, he gives us the story of his own grief, unflinchingly observed.
This is a book of intense honesty and insight; it is at once a celebration of love and a profound examination of sorrow.

messageRe: Tuesday Tipplers Book Club - newbies welcome
Posted by kennethw 28 November, 2016 14:55

I'll go for A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters, because I've never read it and feel I should.

Goto Page: Previous1234567891011Next
Current Page: 6 of 11

Back to top of page
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.
Donate                   Terms of use                  Help & FAQs                   Advertise               RSS rss feed