Forum Sponsors

www.bramly.co.uk

http://www.gardenia-gardens.com

www.advancedpainters.co.uk

Advertise here

The East Dulwich Forum
Which pubs, bars, restaurants and take-aways do you avoid?
Goto Page: PreviousFirst...8485868788899091929394...LastNext
Current Page: 89 of 111
messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JohnL February 20, 01:47PM

Such a Soubry comment (by Anna Soubry)

“I’m not leaving the Conservative party. It has left me,”

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by uncleglen February 20, 01:57PM

Anna Soubry- Born in Lincolnshire, MP for Broxtowe an area that voted LEAVE- the woman has lost touch with her roots and constituents...good riddance
Still, having been a barrister AND a journalist- double whammy in the libturd stakes

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JoeLeg February 20, 02:15PM

uncleglen Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Anna Soubry- Born in Lincolnshire, MP for Broxtowe
> an area that voted LEAVE- the woman has lost touch
> with her roots and constituents...good riddance
> Still, having been a barrister AND a journalist-
> double whammy in the libturd stakes


And yet Kate Hoey is allowed to ignore the fact that 70% of HER constituents voted Remain?

Let me see if I understand your “logic”...

- MP voted Remain, but constituents voted Leave, MP is duty-bound to support Leave. Ok, yeah, fair enough - I see where you’re coming from on that. They work for us and so on.

- MP voted Leave, but constituents voted Remain (by a far greater margin than the overall result), MO is duty-bound to lecture those constituents about how wrong they are and then ignore their opinions. Um, hang on...isn’t that exactly what you objected to for so many years, and isn’t that completely twisted? And massively hypocritical? Yes. Yes it is.

Oh, and look - “libturd”. Your term of abuse for anyone who disagrees with you.
I bet you looked fetching in your yellow vest. Funny how they say people get more right-wing as they age, eh?

“Libturd”...dear oh dear...



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was february 20, 02:16pm by JoeLeg.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by rendelharris February 20, 03:57PM

uncleglen Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> Still, having been a barrister AND a journalist-
> double whammy in the libturd stakes

Boris Johnson and Michael Gove are journalists. Winston Churchill was a journalist. Geoffrey Cox is a barrister and so was Margaret Thatcher. Seriously, take some water with it and try not to start so early.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by keano77 February 20, 04:55PM

European Medicines Agency loses battle to end UK lease over Brexit

Leaving EU does not ‘frustrate’ contract with landlord Canary Wharf Group, high court rules

[www.theguardian.com]

Its case was obviously ‘frustrated’

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JohnL February 22, 01:16PM

Seems the Bankers have signed their own deal with the EU.

[www.theguardian.com]

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JoeLeg February 22, 01:42PM

Well isn’t that nice for them...

As usual, those in power look after themselves and f’ the rest of us.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JohnL February 25, 03:32PM

Oh dear. not many friends left in the world it seems.

[www.theguardian.com]

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by Captain Marvel February 25, 03:42PM

What might the islanders do with a long range bomber base, naval dockyard and a satellite telecommunications station?

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JohnL February 26, 02:11PM

OK this is even more chaos now - someone tried to draw a decision tree of Mays latest plan - but what happens when you get to the bottom right - you can't say no deal as it's already been voted down in the earlier portion of the decision tree.

[twitter.com]

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JoeLeg February 26, 02:29PM

The thing is that if we don’t present an alternative by 23:00 on 29/03/19, we crash out with No Deal regardless, so ironically both sides now have something to play brinkmanship over.

May is gambling that enough people are fearful of No Deal and will vote for something - anything - else to avoid it.

The ERG and it’s pals will now be gambling that they can defeat everything thus leaving us with the legally unavoidable default position of No Deal.

This will be...interesting.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JohnL February 26, 03:21PM

JoeLeg Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
>
> The ERG and it’s pals will now be gambling that
> they can defeat everything thus leaving us with
> the legally unavoidable default position of No
> Deal.
>

But if they vote

1. Mays Deal Yes or No
and that fails
2. No Deal Yes or No
and that fails
3. Extension Yes or No
and that fails

Then to go to No Deal at that stage would directly contradict the vote in No2 - unless May's just playing silly b*ggers and has no intention of listening to any of it if her deal goes down.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JoeLeg February 26, 03:46PM

The problem is that as it stands we HAVE to leave the EU at 23:00 on 29/03/19.

Is the govt cannot come up with something that they agree between themselves and the EU by that point then we have No Deal and it’s the hardest of Brexits. That’s the position right now, and it will continue to be so unless and until an alternative is offered.

Even if it directly contradicts the vote against No Deal, that won’t matter because all it mean is that we’ve been unable to present an alternative in time.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JohnL February 26, 04:50PM

Thats what the revised flow chart is showing sad smiley

[www.bbc.co.uk]

This is all heading to a bad place IMHO.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JohnL February 26, 04:59PM

Ken Clarke is the voice of reason at the moment (maybe as he's father of the house)


"May I congratulate the prime minister on accepting that we are not remotely ready for the chaos of a no-deal departure on 29 March? I agree with her that no deal at any time would bring very damaging medium and long-term prospects for the British economy and our wellbeing. I will continue to vote for any withdrawal agreement that she manages to get with the other EU countries, but I doubt that she will command a majority for any such agreement in the near future.

Can I turn to the real issue now? How long is the delay that we are contemplating? The prime minister seems to be giving us a date for a new cliff edge at the end of June, but is not the danger that we will merely continue the present pantomime performance through the next three months, and that the public will be dismayed as we approach that date and find that there is similar chaos about where we are going?

May I suggest that we contemplate a much calmer delay, that we have indicative votes following debates in this House, to see where a consensus or majority lies, and then that we prepare our position for the much more important long-term negotiations that have to take place on the eventual settlement? We cannot have several more years of what we have had for the past two years. We have to start proper negotiations with the EU on what exactly we contemplate as our long-term relationships with the Union."

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by robbin February 27, 12:53PM

keano77 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> European Medicines Agency loses battle to end UK
> lease over Brexit
>
> Leaving EU does not ‘frustrate’ contract with
> landlord Canary Wharf Group, high court rules
>
> [www.theguardian.com]
> uropean-medicines-agency-loses-bid-to-end-uk-lease
> -over-brexit
>
> Its case was obviously ‘frustrated’

You don't say! This must be one of the least surprising results in court during the last year!

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by robbin February 27, 01:11PM

TE44 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> The link I attached was refering to it being
> upheld in the context of leases albeit in a small
> lease of days.My mistake. Will the transcript of
> the court case be public, does anyone know.

Yes, of course. It is at neutral citation ref [2019] EWHC 335 (Ch). Or you could just click on this link to read the judgment...

[www.judiciary.uk]


Here's a very small part of it...

247. In short, I do not consider the present situation to come close to a case of frustration of common purpose. Considering the test articulated in paragraph 38 above, the fact is that hindsight has shown that the EMA has paid too high a price for the Premises it acquired, in that it failed to build into the lease the flexibility as to term that events have shown would have been in its commercial interests.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was february 27, 01:16pm by robbin.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by diable rouge March 01, 01:04PM

Welcome to Global Brexit UK... [twitter.com]

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JoeLeg March 01, 04:24PM

Any Leave voter who still thinks we will do well out of a trade deal with the USA should read this.

They’re already showing how they intend to screw us. They’re not even hiding it.

[mobile.twitter.com]

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JohnL March 02, 11:05AM

Slovenia seems to have more say in the world than Theresa May.

What a downhill slide that woman has taken us on.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by carlafindle March 02, 11:29AM

JohnL Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Slovenia seems to have more say in the world than
> Theresa May.
>
> What a downhill slide that woman has taken us on.

You've only just noticed?

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JohnL March 04, 12:33PM

Failing Grayling now internationally known.

[www.nytimes.com]

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by malumbu March 04, 10:19PM

Boring one liners and links - Grayling not a lot to do with the Brexit outcome, toeing the party line and a safe leaver to have on the Cabinet. Start a new thread if you want to discuss him..

Here's a more interesting two liner without a link. Today's bribe to the North and Midlands who voted out - 'Tories magic Brexit money tree'. Or as quite well put by the Labour spokesperson - throwing money at the problem rather than solving it (ie why so many felt disaffected - austerity having much to do with it).

There, loads of substantial stuff to discuss. A pleasure.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by cella March 04, 10:50PM

Your first word sums up most of your posts Malumbu - usually just plain weird - why bother.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JohnL March 05, 08:42AM

malumbu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Boring one liners and links - Grayling not a lot
> to do with the Brexit outcome, toeing the party
> line and a safe leaver to have on the Cabinet.
> Start a new thread if you want to discuss him..
>
> Here's a more interesting two liner without a
> link. Today's bribe to the North and Midlands who
> voted out - 'Tories magic Brexit money tree'. Or
> as quite well put by the Labour spokesperson -
> throwing money at the problem rather than solving
> it (ie why so many felt disaffected - austerity
> having much to do with it).
>
> There, loads of substantial stuff to discuss. A
> pleasure.

Boring is one of my better features smiling smiley

The EU budget for the same area in a similar time frame was 11 billion - so nowhere near matching it.

[www.telegraph.co.uk]

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JoeLeg March 05, 09:13AM

malumbu Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Boring one liners and links - Grayling not a lot
> to do with the Brexit outcome, toeing the party
> line and a safe leaver to have on the Cabinet.
> Start a new thread if you want to discuss him..

Dude...Wheaton’s Law, yeah?



>
> Here's a more interesting two liner without a
> link. Today's bribe to the North and Midlands who
> voted out - 'Tories magic Brexit money tree'. Or
> as quite well put by the Labour spokesperson -
> throwing money at the problem rather than solving
> it (ie why so many felt disaffected - austerity
> having much to do with it).
>
> There, loads of substantial stuff to discuss. A
> pleasure.


You must be a riot at parties...

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by malumbu March 05, 12:33PM

My apologies I should have used the description of recent postings as superficial, rather than boring. I am in deed boring as I am rather repetitive. But pleased to see that I did not cause offence. And yes, I am an absolute riot at parties. Please feel free to invite me.

Worried that there is some sort of virus though, or botnet, as my posts appear to get an instant but irrelevant response.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by JohnL March 05, 12:48PM

I'll try and be relevant an smiling smiley I'm feeling like almost giving up on Brexit (but the fact Mrs May wants us to do that makes me go on). The whole of government has now been effected by Brexit - it's not functioning normally or properly anymore.

Grayling would be sacked under normal circumstances in my view.
May is coming out with statements (like there's no link between police numbers and violent attacks) which are just nonsensical and I can't see them being made in normal times.
Suella Braverman was on TV earlier talking about "getting through" and seeming not to understand how WTO tariffs would work.


Oh and Toyota and BMW both saying UK jobs at risk
[www.theguardian.com]

and now the media spotlight is off Honda, of course Brexit was a factor in their closure.
[www.theguardian.com]

Can't the Grown Ups take back control of the country.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by robbin March 05, 01:57PM

JohnL Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> > Here's a more interesting two liner without a
> > link. Today's bribe to the North and Midlands
> who
> > voted out - 'Tories magic Brexit money tree'.
> Or
> > as quite well put by the Labour spokesperson -
> > throwing money at the problem rather than
> solving...
> ...The EU budget for the same area in a similar time
> frame was 11 billion - so nowhere near matching
> it.
>
Just to be clear - was the quoted sum of £11 bn from the EU given for free, or were there costs involved in getting that amount which should be factored into the equation?

In other words, given that the UK is a NET contributor (it pays more of its money to the EU than it receives back) do you think that is anything to be taken into account when assessing the merits of a particular course, or should it be ignored?

Say I buy a new car for £60k. Can I validly claim my assets have increased by £60k because now I have a new car, or would that be a nonsense, because I shelled out £60k of my money to acquire it in the first place? What if I overpaid, so I paid £60k to receive a car with a value of £40k? Did I benefit by £60k? Or did I suffer a net loss of £20k because I paid out more than I received?

Just wondering...



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was march 05, 02:03pm by robbin.

messageRe: Brexit View
Posted by Jenny1 March 05, 04:17PM

Robbin. I thought you were involved in banking or business of some sort and would therefore have a clearer idea about how the UK's contributions to the EU allow us to access the benefits of trade that it offers, thus enhancing the profits of our businesses? That's where the real financial benefits lie. The fact that deprived areas of the UK also receive EU investment (much more than any UK government is ever likely to invest, and certainly not this one) is an added bonus.

Goto Page: PreviousFirst...8485868788899091929394...LastNext
Current Page: 89 of 111

Back to top of page
Sorry, only registered users may post in this forum.
Donate                   Terms of use                  Help & FAQs                   Advertise               RSS rss feed               Copyright 2006 - 2018 East Dulwich Forum