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messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by yard January 07, 05:21AM

quite easily, once sitting, petting and talking calmly, also bribing with a cat treat.

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by fishbiscuits January 07, 06:01PM

Is it controversial to suggest that you shouldn't feel morally obliged to keep a violent creature in your home?

I'm not totally averse to our feline friends, but if the thing is actually attacking you even when left alone... well...

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by DiD January 07, 06:05PM

Thanks @Fishbiscuits. I appreciate that. Yes, I don't feel morally obliged (though others may disagree with me). Trying to be patient, though, as I know it will traumatise her to move her again. But if she doesn't chill and stop attacking me then that option will indeed need to be considered, as I'm not prepared to live in fear in my own home....

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by fishbiscuits January 07, 06:33PM

Your patience - and intentions - are admirable.

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by cordsm January 07, 07:59PM

My rescue cat from Battersea took about 3-4 months to fully settle in (he had been found on the streets, arrived at Battersea, been adopted by a family & then returned to Battersea 1 week later). He would be affectionate a lot of the time, but would also randomly launch himself through the air & attack my legs. He clearly felt threatened in some way, but I found it hard to understand what was triggering the attacks. If he saw another cat in the garden, he would also attack me (redirected aggression). I got to the stage where I was thinking that I'd made a massive mistake & was considering contacting Battersea, but he ended up calming down & he's such a great cat now. It just took longer than I had anticipated for him to settle. Good Luck!

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by peckham_ryu January 07, 11:33PM

Its like youre describing my late cat. Also a British short hair, taken on when previous owners divorced. She was evil 70% of the time at first, but slowly worked herself up to becoming a lapcat. Ill be honest, it took her a few years with me to fully cut out the random furious ambushes.

I assume that mine and maybe yours were dealing with something like PTSD. Biologically, a general excess of nor-adrenaline in the system, making them ready to go into fight mode. I dealt with mine by picking the little spitting fury up and shutting her out in the garden for a spell each time. Not 100% effective when she went for guerilla tactics (slash and dash, to a hissing retreat under a bed), and all very unpleasant until she calmed down. Still, she did calm down eventually and become completely and utterly lovely. Theres hope for them all, if they are given the opportunity to settle. Best of luck.

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by Jules-and-Boo January 08, 09:51AM

I think it just takes time - longer than you think. I also had the same dilemma but it all just worked out.

It took around 3 months for the cats to get used to our rescue dog and now they're all fine.

I do wish you well

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by Gaynor Hill January 17, 03:04PM

Have you managed to sort out you cat

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by DiD January 21, 11:37AM

Thanks @Gaynor Hill for asking, I really appreciate it. She's definitely getting a bit better, and she seems more relaxed, though she did try and prevent me from leaving the house the other day, as she stood by my bag and hissed whenever I tried to take it...

But I'm hopeful that she'll settle in. We do still put her in another room if anyone is coming over (husband does this, and she won't let me lift her). She is, however, very good at opening doors, as she jumps up and swings on door handles until they open for her. (that being said we can't seem to get her to use a cat flap, no matter how many treats we seem to use to entice her...she would prefer to swing on door handles).

We had originally named her 'Kangaroo' because she was so jumpy but now because of her slightly split personality, we have taken to calling her Jekyll-Roo.

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by Jules-and-Boo January 21, 11:45AM

sounds like things are starting to turn around for you :-)

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by Sue January 21, 04:07PM

How on earth did she learn to swing on door handles?

Clever cat!

smiling smiley

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by DiD January 21, 04:15PM

Good question. If I can get her on video doing it, I'll share it here!

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by Gaynor Hill January 21, 04:18PM

That's good, I've got a cat and she hisses sometimes and if she doesn't want to be stroked she taps you with her paw and she's 15 and been with me since she was 3 months old she hides when people come under the bed unless she knows them well
Sadly if kittens don't get attention from adults when they are born after 8 weeks they start to fear humans so she was just reverting back to being wild she been fine
Mines a sweetheart when she was younger used to jump out and grab my leg but that's just playing for them
I used to tell her when she tapped me with paw not to do that
They understand
Gaynor

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by carlafindle January 21, 07:46PM

Sue Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> How on earth did she learn to swing on door
> handles?
>
> Clever cat!
>
> smiling smiley

Lots of cats can do that.

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by Sue January 23, 12:08AM

carlafindle Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Sue Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > How on earth did she learn to swing on door
> > handles?
> >
> > Clever cat!
> >
> > smiling smiley
>
> Lots of cats can do that.


How did any of them learn to swing on door handles, then? big grin

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by Jules-and-Boo January 23, 10:06AM

they watch you

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by hpsaucey January 23, 03:26PM

Jules-and-Boo Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> they watch you


My old cat learnt how to use the loo that way ...

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by DiD January 23, 08:38PM

Wow, how can we teach her how to do that?! It would certainly endear me to her more....

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by Sue January 23, 09:04PM

DiD Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Wow, how can we teach her how to do that?! It
> would certainly endear me to her more....


big grin

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by DiD January 26, 10:03PM

urgh, she was getting much better, then annoyingly seemed to turn again, attacking me twice yesterday, including chasing me up the stairs! Big problem seems to be that she senses my fear, but yes I'm scared! She seems fine with the husband.... How long do I give this?!

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by Gaynor Hill January 27, 03:01AM

She probably is playing with you I really hope she can settle with you

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by IlonaM January 27, 07:26AM

DiD Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> urgh, she was getting much better, then annoyingly
> seemed to turn again, attacking me twice
> yesterday, including chasing me up the stairs! Big
> problem seems to be that she senses my fear, but
> yes I'm scared! She seems fine with the
> husband.... How long do I give this?!

There may well be setbacks, but if you've noticed a trend in improved behaviour you're heading in the right direction!! Keep your nerve and act cofident & calm even if you are nervous around her. Cats, along with dogs, horses etc., pick up on your energy and will mirror it. If you're nervous or scared, she will react to that. Stand tall and don't give her someone to chase. It's tiring, but it sounds as if you're all doing brilliantly in helping her settle into life as a calmer more well-adjusted cat.

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by lucky January 29, 12:06AM

Hi,
She might be hungry or insecure about her next meal. How frequently are you feeding her and how frequently did her previous owners fed her?

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by DiD January 29, 07:15AM

That's a very good question...her previous owner fed her on demand, apparently, though I don't really know what that means in practice.

We feed her morning and night and leave a bowl of dry food for her to nibble on, so there should be no insecurity. Its probably too much food, and we need to wean it down somehow. But she is always asking for food even with the bowl of dry food always there, which she does eat, but the crack cocaine version of wet food we're giving her (Sheba) -- only because that's what she was fed before -- may indeed be contributing to her demands. But I'm loathe to wean her off of it right now for fear of causing further stress.

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by Gaynor Hill January 29, 12:12PM

Kind will only eat Sheba, had one cat who wouldn't eat cat food so he had boiled chicken cats will only eat what they want to
She might just want you to play with her when she cries as she's still a kitten and they need to play and run wild I use those things on string she goes on and on if I don't play with her now as the other cat died December sadly
Have you tried cat nip 8 sprinkle it on her scratches and toys they go crazy then sleep
Keep us updated with her

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by DiD January 29, 01:18PM

Thanks Gaynor, we play with her, and she plays well on her own....she has a couple of balls that she carries and throws everywhere. She was a single cat before. She also has access to the outside....

This morning's shenanigans involved her sitting on the kitchen table (not allowed) and hissing at me when I told her no, get down, calmly and persistently. Defiant.

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by hammerman January 29, 11:59PM

I do feel for you DiD. I've grown up with lots of cats and now have three that are part of our home.

To get your cat down from the kitchen table I would calmly flick some water from the kitchen tap at her. She will soon associate the feel of water (which most cats hate) to not wanting to sit on the kitchen table or anywhere else.

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by kiera January 30, 12:18AM

DID - She may not have been defiant. She may not have understood what you were saying but did understand that you were not pleased with her.

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by first mate January 30, 08:18AM

To add to the above, cats will gravitate to high spots to rest, they feel safer. Trying to move any creature from a point of safety and security can rile them. Because she had no access to outside in her home before, indoor space is probably much more important to her. Cats can be very territorial and unwillingness to share space can apply to humans as well as other cats.
It is not clear how old this cat is but the constant hunger seems a bit odd. Presumably early signs of hyperthyroidism has been ruled out? If a young cat that would not be relevant but wonder what vet says about feeding and diet? Might be worth a chat about Sheba- your crack cocaine description may be more accurate than you think.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was january 30, 08:21am by first mate.

messageRe: Advice: rehoming a difficult cat
Posted by DiD January 30, 08:25AM

Loving the cat behaviour expertise on here. Haven't ruled out hyperthyroidism, but she's less than 2 years old. Would it be possible?

As she settled a bit, (mostly only angry with me, it seems -- she can smell my fear) we haven't brought her back to the Vet. We'll see how the next few weeks go. She is certainly territorial at times, but she also wants to be around us -- she follows us and rarely stays on her own anywhere except when she's sleeping, and at night we can see she's been in our room as we find her soft fluffy balls in the room. And oddly, her favourite space isn't up high its on a cushion on the floor.

I'm really really really missing my kind loving Burmese cat who died early last year sad smiley

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