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The East Dulwich Forum
The Bishop, The EDT, The Great Exhibition, the Actress or another?
messageFlowers in East Dulwich
Posted by jamesmcash September 06, 10:01PM

Dear all

A resident recently contacted me about wild flowers. As you may be aware, in addition to the visual benefits, wild flowers have a significant environmental impact in supporting pollinators like bees and butterflies. We can make a small contribution to averting ecological disaster.

I would like to introduce more flowers - either wild or from bulbs - into the local area. I already have a few ideas for potential locations but I would be keen to hear more. I am talking about existing grassy areas - not spaces for raised beds. They do not need to be large though: a few square metres can have an impact.

What do you think? Would you like to see more flowers in East Dulwich?

And do you have any ideas for where they could go?

Best wishes
James

--------------------
James McAsh - Labour Councillor for Goose Green ward
James.McAsh@Southwark.gov.uk
[www.jamesmcash.com] [twitter.com]

Surgeries: 2nd and 4th Thursdays of the month at 7pm, East Dulwich Community Centre on Darrell Road

Sign up to the Goose Green councillor newsletter: [www.jamesmcash.com]

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by Elaine25 September 06, 10:23PM

It would be lovely to see wild flowers in Peckham rye park or piermont green.Dulwich parks wild flowers this year were beautiful!

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by Sue September 06, 10:52PM

The Goose Green wild flower area was very disappointing this year.

It looked like it had had no attention at all since last year (which was lovely).

I would like to see wild flowers planted/sown in tree pits.

But when my grandkids did this a few years back, the plants were sprayed by the council weed killers sad smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was september 06, 10:54pm by Sue.

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by Pugwash September 07, 03:19PM

In some country areas - wild flowers are sown around the base of trees, along grass verges and in front of hedges.

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by se22cat September 07, 04:08PM

Totally agree with Sue, they were a lovely feature, assumed this year there just wasn't enough funding? Goose Green does seem to have less attention paid to it by the council every passing year sad smiley

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by Humdinger September 09, 12:37PM

I'd probably prefer to see a Wetherspoons ahead of some flowers, to be honest.

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by Penguin68 September 09, 01:43PM

Some nurseries offer packs of 'naturalising' bulbs - which would be good for areas which are not frequently disturbed. This is the planting which keeps on giving. Otherwise pollinator friendly wild flowers would be a good choice (expenditure on Goose Green roundabout tends to be of the 'rebuild because another over-large lorry has rammed it' nature. Perhaps there's nothing much left for horticulture there?).

We are lucky in the south of the borough to have so much parkland available. And to have quite (and quiet) leafy streets (the planting of ornamental cherries really paid back this year).

Planting in tree pits has the drawback that these are often quite arid and can be vandalised. When it does work it's lovely.

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by Sue September 09, 03:46PM

Penguin68 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

>
> Planting in tree pits has the drawback that these
> are often quite arid and can be vandalised. When
> it does work it's lovely.


The soil can be enriched, though.

Somebody in Ashbourne Grove (I think) has planted up several tree pits, which are lovely to see.

A lot of residents in Islington do it, and there is (or was, I presume there still is) a category in Islington in Bloom for them. To the best of my recollection, the only vandalism was by council workers spraying them despite having been sent a list of where they were sad smiley

My younger grandchild put a poster on the tree outside my house (North Cross Road area) asking that the plants in the pit not be sprayed, but still they did it sad smiley

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by sjsl September 09, 04:30PM

The path from Greendale to Sainsburys... I've sown wild flower seeds there in the past but it's mostly mahonia shrubs, I'm sure more could be made of the edges of this path.

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by katanita September 10, 08:37PM

I'm hoping someone here is more expert on this than me, but my understanding is that it is sometimes ecologically preferable to allow an area to rewild itself rather than introduce new species. May not work for smaller areas, or in central London with so many introduced plant varieties around, though? Anyone know more?

Would love to see more wild areas generally!

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by Sue September 10, 10:04PM

I think that refers more to introducing new species which would not normally be found in that geographical area?

I might be wrong.

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by katanita September 10, 10:18PM

It might do. I was following this twitter conversation with interest. Refers to larger brownfield sites though [twitter.com].

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by Chris99 September 12, 01:17PM

Some planting of wild flowers can be beneficial for wildlife and attractive for people - but Katanita is right - it's also amazing what can happen if you just stop mowing grass within an inch of its life and let nature do its thing.

Green Dale Fields is a good example of this (old playing fields left for 20+ years and reclaimed by nature).

There are loads of places in the area where week after week the summer the Council will cut the grass, even though the areas aren't used by people (often areas around Council estates, for example). Reducing the cutting of some of these areas once or twice a year, or leaving patches unmown, so wild plants can grow would make these areas much better ecologically - and save the Council (and, by extension us, the tax payers) money.

It would be great if James could explore this, as well as some planting of wild flowers.

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by Humdinger September 12, 03:15PM

There's a good chance any flowers planted will get wrecked by loutish pub goers on the way home after a skinful.

There were some destructive looking types eating the 24 (*now reduced to 19.95) Sunday roasts outside the Palmerston on Sunday, i overheard them saying they were intent on going and breaking branches off the palm tree thing in the middle of Goose Green roundabout. Exercise your green fingers and brighten up the area at your own peril, ill say.

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by JohnL September 12, 03:48PM

The weeping willow tree on Peckham Rye that was chopped back to a trunk has spouted loads of greenery - it's not anywhere near dead like I thought smiling smiley

messageRe: Flowers in East Dulwich
Posted by BrandNewGuy September 12, 03:52PM

Yes, in fact that tree split and toppled over last year. The council then tidied it up and I was glad they didn't remove it entirely. Its sibling weeping willow next to the road is looking fabulous.


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