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messageNot so wild crow
Posted by ponderwoman 29 October, 2019 20:20

A friend alerted me to a crow in Peckham Park in distress and apparently unable to fly. Several concerned people were surrounding the bush it was hiding under to keep dogs away and be sure of where it was. I took it home, then to Medivets because it had a small injury, they confirmed its wing was not broken though the first 2 primary feathers had been pulled out so it is probably too sore and bruised to fly.

When put in a crate it immediately ate the food I had given it despite me being only a foot away. Peckham crows are profoundly cynical about seemingly good intentioned people so this seemed odd.

Today it was happy to sit on my arm and poke my jumper. SO, NOT a wild crow. This poses a problem for release as it may not be up to scratch with the strict peckham crow social code and therefore be attacked.

Does anyone know where it has come from or who might have reared/cared for it?

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by intexasatthe moment 29 October, 2019 20:30

You think it is someones pet ? Could it have just sort of bonded with you as it's rescuer ? Or because it senses your innate kindness ?

If it's domesticated do you think that's why the other crows were making such a fuss ? Rejecting a stranger ?

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by Sue 29 October, 2019 21:34

That was a very kind thing to do, ponderwoman.

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by hammerman 29 October, 2019 23:12

ponderwoman Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> A friend alerted me to a crow in Peckham Park in
> distress and apparently unable to fly. Several
> concerned people were surrounding the bush it was
> hiding under to keep dogs away and be sure of
> where it was. I took it home, then to Medivets
> because it had a small injury, they confirmed its
> wing was not broken though the first 2 primary
> feathers had been pulled out so it is probably too
> sore and bruised to fly.
>
> When put in a crate it immediately ate the food I
> had given it despite me being only a foot away.
> Peckham crows are profoundly cynical about
> seemingly good intentioned people so this seemed
> odd.
>
> Today it was happy to sit on my arm and poke my
> jumper. SO, NOT a wild crow. This poses a problem
> for release as it may not be up to scratch with
> the strict peckham crow social code and therefore
> be attacked.
>
> Does anyone know where it has come from or who
> might have reared/cared for it?

Crows are very social birds and they can recognise a human face/features for many years.

I have many that rely on me for feeding and social interaction with other birds.

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by intexasatthe moment 30 October, 2019 07:50

If one were to regularly feed the crows on Peckham Rye and then rescue an injured one of their number would that crow then treat you like a friendly adopter ?

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by Sally Eva 30 October, 2019 07:55

crows are highly intelligent. I think it just likes you. Quite right too.

[www.thoughtco.com]

While a crow's brain may seem small in comparison to a human brain, what matters is the size of the brain in relation to the size of the animal. Relative to its body, a crow's brain and a primate brain are comparable. According to Professor John Marzluff at the University of Washington's Aviation Conservation Lab, a crow is essentially a flying monkey. Whether it's a friendly monkey or more like a fiend from "The Wizard of Oz" depends a lot on what you've done to the crow (or any of its friends).

Can you tell one crow from another? In this respect, a crow may be smarter than you because it can recognize individual human faces. Marzluff's team captured crows, tagged them, and released them. Members of the team wore different masks. Crows would dive-bomb and scold people wearing a mask, but only if the mask had been worn by someone who had messed with them.

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by Huggers 30 October, 2019 12:23

I think other crows protect an injured crow so as long as he is released to where he last saw his family, it could be ok.

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by Zig-Zag 30 October, 2019 22:48

How lovely you rescued him! Maybe the RSPB could give you some advice about releasing him?

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by turtle 31 October, 2019 15:44

ponderwoman Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> A friend alerted me to a crow in Peckham Park in
> distress and apparently unable to fly. Several
> concerned people were surrounding the bush it was
> hiding under to keep dogs away and be sure of
> where it was. I took it home, then to Medivets
> because it had a small injury, they confirmed its
> wing was not broken though the first 2 primary
> feathers had been pulled out so it is probably too
> sore and bruised to fly.
>
> When put in a crate it immediately ate the food I
> had given it despite me being only a foot away.
> Peckham crows are profoundly cynical about
> seemingly good intentioned people so this seemed
> odd.
>
> Today it was happy to sit on my arm and poke my
> jumper. SO, NOT a wild crow. This poses a problem
> for release as it may not be up to scratch with
> the strict peckham crow social code and therefore
> be attacked.
>
> Does anyone know where it has come from or who
> might have reared/cared for it?


Would live to hear how he/she got on.

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by alice 04 November, 2019 13:47

Yes to have a crow in your home is a privilege. Did the wing heal? Is the crow back?

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by BrandNewGuy 04 November, 2019 15:58

Esther Woolfson's book "Corvus: A Life With Birds" is a fascinating and funny book about making a home for crows (including a rook and magpie).

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by exdulwicher 04 November, 2019 18:52

Crows are ace - super intelligent and if you work with them enough, they can learn to speak a few words too! They're certainly pretty trainable, they'll come on command.

messageRe: Not so wild crowattachment
Posted by tarafitness 05 November, 2019 09:47

The crows in PR park are becoming a bit of a menace to those with young children! Yes, they are super bright and have worked out that buggies containing toddlers are likely to be covered in crumbs and other snack debris. They follow you round the playground and mob the buggies - so cheeky! They show zero fear of parents/children, and I'm sure if I held out a hand with food they'd come and take it. Definitely not so wild, those ones smiling smiley

On the subject - are there different types? some are luscious black, and others more scrawny and grey, do we have ravens and rooks? I know I have beautiful jays in the garden since bringing back some acorns from sydenham hill woods - did you know they stash and bury them, just like squirrels!

Attachments: Screenshot_20191105-092219_Gallery-270x555.jpg (135.4KB)   Screenshot_20191105-091222_Gallery-270x555.jpg (151.1KB)   Screenshot_20191105-091123_Gallery-270x555.jpg (129KB)  
messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by BrandNewGuy 05 November, 2019 10:00

No, they're all carrion crows – the 'regular' kind of crow. The fledgling crows take a while to get their dark black sheen, plus I've noticed quite a bit of albinism in the Peckham Rye crow population. There are several with a number of white and grey feathers.

Someone I know has made a short film about these crows as they're a fascinating example of a species changing its behaviour relatively quickly in the face of changes in the environment. Traditionally in the countryside, carrion crows were relatively solitary birds, whereas rooks were the highly sociable kind. But as crows have moved into towns and cities, they've become more sociable (probably a good strategy for finding food and finding a mate) and have developed social hierarchies. This is just within the last twenty years or so, which is remarkably rapid. But crows, as has been said, are amazingly good learners and experimenters, so they've found a niche quickly and successfully.

As you can probably tell, I love 'em smiling smiley

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by tarafitness 05 November, 2019 10:13

BrandNewGuy Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

>
> As you can probably tell, I love 'em smiling smiley

haha yes, I get that impression!

I'm pretty sure I've seen some of these a few times, I recognise the shape of their heads. Not amongst the highly organised buggy mobs though smiling smiley

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by BrandNewGuy 05 November, 2019 10:38

Yes, there are one or two jackdaws around, but they tend not to mix with the carrion crows. They're also very resourceful and will sneak about near the crows looking for food opportunities.

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by JohnL 05 November, 2019 11:12

Wow - It's like another world smiling smiley

Is there a Chief Crow.

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by exdulwicher 05 November, 2019 20:07

http://m.quickmeme.com/img/78/782a39098bc6501556a37be9ca9684fc7df9b26f68b8af799adf2141145e333a.jpg

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by exdulwicher 05 November, 2019 20:16

Quote:
Is there a Chief Crow?

Some guy called Jack Daw. He's stark raven mad though.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was 2019:11:05:20:19:51 by exdulwicher.

messageRe: Not so wild crow
Posted by Sue 06 November, 2019 00:21

exdulwicher Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> [m.quickmeme.com]
> 7be9ca9684fc7df9b26f68b8af799adf2141145e333a.jpg


That's a bit subtle big grin


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