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messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Peckhamgatecrasher March 29, 07:29AM

Social distancing!

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by AC1964 March 29, 10:07AM

Re goldfinches. We're at the Dawsons Heights end of Dunstans Road. There are numerous small flocks in the area. Once you recognise the sound they make, you'll hear them constantly flying around.

I spotted a peregrine falcon overhead a few days ago - on a west-to-east glide/shallow stoop . Put a few pigeons into a state of panic...

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by AylwardS March 29, 02:02PM

I’ve seen my first peacock butterfly in the last week and signs of nest building.

Time to spend in the garden? This ma have some ideas on what you could do to make your garden more wildlife friendly. You will hopefully see the “you build it and they come” results in a few weeks.

RSPB Give nature a home in our garden activities
[www.rspb.org.uk]

Or already getting birds in your garden I found this set of resources for schools taking part in the Big Garden Birdwatch but some of the resources might be of interest even if you have not children to share the birds in your garden with at the moment. [www.rspb.org.uk]

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by MarkT April 01, 11:29AM

Malumbu,
"Can you get rid of duck weed?"

If you are starting with the new pond liner, you are in with a chance. You must quarantine all the plants you are transferring. First shake them thoroughly in a bucket of water and any loose duck weed will float out so can scim it off with a net. Hand pick any that is still adhering. When you think the plants are clean, leave them in quarantine for a week or two and check them a couple of times. Even the tiniest duckweed leaves will grow to full size in that time. Do likewise with any mud and water you are transferring.

I have collection of sinks with a variety of plant mixes, and locations. I get frogs in some and newts in others.

I would like to eliminate the surface duckweed (lemna minor) entirely, which I am doing progressively as I clean out any individual sink every few years. However I encourage its relative Lemna trisulca, which is a submerged oxygenator.

MarkT

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by LoulaRose April 01, 01:25PM

I saw (what I thought) was a peregrine falcon in Dulwich Woods this morning!

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by malumbu April 01, 05:03PM

MarkT Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Malumbu,
> "Can you get rid of duck weed?"
>
> If you are starting with the new pond liner, you are in with a chance. You must quarantine all the plants you are transferring. First shake them thoroughly in a bucket of water and any loose duck weed will float out so can scim it off with a net. Hand pick any that is still adhering. When you think the plants are clean, leave them in
> quarantine for a week or two and check them a couple of times. Even the tiniest duckweed leaves will grow to full size in that time. Do likewise with any mud and water you are transferring.
> MarkT


Thanks Mark, I did my best to remove the duckweed, but did not quarantine plants and now picking the stuff out or skimming with a tea strainer. Probably futile but I seem to have time on my hands. PM me if you want some yellow iris, it spreads quickly so I have a lot to spare. Delivery can wait until times are easier.

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by yeknomyeknom April 02, 08:20AM

We saw 5 of these waxwings on the rooftops near peckham rye this morning.

Peckhamgatecrasher Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Interesting article if you are into birdwatching:
>
> [www.theguardian.com]
> dwatching-from-your-garden-the-wildlife-travel-dra
> ma-on-your-doorstep

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Nigello April 02, 02:26PM

I’ve run out of feed. I usually get it from the pound shop near Lidl but I’ve not been out. If anyone has any seed, etc they could let me have then please let me know by PM. Thanks

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by PlantPower April 02, 03:59PM

I had a squirrel crash land on my kitchen window from a nearby beech, first time ever. It was mad. Also hearing a lot of bird song in the absence of all the #dy planes on Heathrow flightpath. The silence of the sky above us is a true gift. Normally they start at 6am and fly to midnight. That and the magnolia and camellia are wonderful.

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Zig-Zag April 04, 12:21AM

I had 2 jackdaws eating peanuts from one of my hanging feeders today and then one of them discovered an empty feeder which I had filled with feathers from an old pillow, straw, and cat fur from brushing my cats! I think it's only fair that the cats contribute to the birds nest making...waste not want not. That jackdaw is going to make a very warm comfy nest.

It's usually the sparrows which grab enormous beakfuls of the feathers on offer. They can barely see where they're going as they fly off leaving a cloud of feathers fluttering in their wake.

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Peckhamgatecrasher April 04, 05:14AM

That's a brilliant idea Z-Z. Top hole!

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by IlonaM April 07, 09:01AM

Watch out for the supermoon tonight 7-8th April:

[www.almanac.com]

'Venture outside on the night of Tuesday, April 7, to catch a glimpse of April’s full Pink Moon. This full Moon—which is a supermoon, the first full Moon of spring, and the Paschal Full Moon—will be visible after sunset and reach peak illumination at 10:35 P.M. EDT. ...

Thanks to the fact that April’s full Moon will be closer to Earth than either other supermoon in the series, it will be the biggest and brightest full Moon of 2020! ...

The First Full Moon of Spring & the Paschal Full Moon

April’s full Moon is the first to occur after the March equinox, which makes it the first full Moon of spring and the Paschal Full Moon. The Paschal Full Moon is the full Moon that determines the date of Easter.

NOTE: In April 2020, note that the Full Moon occurs on April 7 in North America, but crests in the wee hours of April 8 (2:35 A.M.) Universal Time. (Universal Time is the mean solar time in Greenwich, England.)'

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Sue April 08, 07:16PM

I have loads of little tadpoles! So happy!

Thanks for the spawn, Lynne! smiling smiley

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by malumbu April 09, 12:19PM

Just relaid my pond but sadly the newts and frogs didn't hang around. However discovered a small amount of frog spawn yesterday - thought it was a bit late. Will the newts come back and eat it as they usually do?

Nice watching the solitary bees collect mud.

No activity in my bird boxes. Cleaned them out, repaired them and the like. A few years ago most of them had nests. Thought it may be building work that put them off when nearby extension going up, and also the house on the hill that is lit up like a Christmas Tree. Followed RSPB guidance on siting etc.

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Peckhamgatecrasher April 09, 01:43PM

I witnessed an avian Spitfire versus ME109 battle this morning.

I was alerted by a rather large crash into my kitchen door: a pigeon (which is annoyingly nesting above) and a magpie were having a massive scrap.

Do magpies take squabs?

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by alice April 09, 04:11PM

Oh lucky you Sue. My taders just disappeared overnight but I seem to have acquired a couple of full grown frogs 🐸

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Sue April 09, 10:24PM

alice Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Oh lucky you Sue. My taders just disappeared
> overnight but I seem to have acquired a couple of
> full grown frogs 🐸


I'm sure most of my taddies will sadly not survive - otherwise the world would be overrun with frogs (might be an improvement, of course smiling smiley )

I think cats and birds eat the spawn and tadpoles, unfortunately.

Full grown frogs are a great addition to the garden smiling smiley

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by yeknomyeknom April 10, 09:12AM

I saw the waxwings again this morning, well one of them. I was drawn by the strange sound. However, on looking up waxwings song online I it all sounds very tuneful and sweet. This bird (previously thought of as waxwing) drew my ear because it sounded like a parrot. We have parasites nearby so I thought, maybe a massive parrot joined them (excuse my naivety). But it was the “waxwing”. The call was a very rough caaw sound in a particular set of melodies. Mindful of a drunken sailor after too many Marlborough. Not sweet at all. Now I’m thinking maybe they were jays all along?

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Sue April 11, 12:01AM

On the allotment today we saw a Red Admiral butterfly, a young fox and a crow.

First butterfly I've seen this year.

❤️

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Peckhamgatecrasher April 11, 07:47AM

Sounds like the first line of a folk song!

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Lynne April 11, 10:27AM

"as I went out to my allotment
with a hey and ho and a nonny
A fine young fox with tail so bonny
and a clever black crow a cawing went
with a etc etc

sort of thing

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Peckhamgatecrasher April 11, 12:07PM

Exactly that. Though you need to work in the Red Admiral.

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Sue April 11, 02:31PM

Peckhamgatecrasher Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Exactly that. Though you need to work in the Red
> Admiral.


That's your project for today, PGC big grin

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Sue April 12, 03:58PM

Saw what we think was a dunnock in the garden this morning.

Is that likely round here?

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by LJC56 April 12, 05:28PM

Sue Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Saw what we think was a dunnock in the garden this
> morning.
>
> Is that likely round here?

I’ve been seeing a small brown bird, not unlike a sparrow, but with a much narrower beak, in the garden in the last few days. I did wonder if it is a dunnock, so would be interested too, to know if that is likely.

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Applespider April 12, 09:31PM

LoulaRose Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> I saw (what I thought) was a peregrine falcon in
> Dulwich Woods this morning!

Quite likely. They nest in the church spire at the bottom of Cox's Walk.

I've had a pair of jays take up residence in the woodland behind the house. I wondered what the odd call was and then spotted two of them in one of the trees... although one has taken to visiting my window box for a rummage in the mornings.

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Sue April 12, 11:06PM

LJC56 Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Sue Wrote:
> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Saw what we think was a dunnock in the garden
> this
> > morning.
> >
> > Is that likely round here?
>
> I’ve been seeing a small brown bird, not unlike a
> sparrow, but with a much narrower beak, in the
> garden in the last few days. I did wonder if it is
> a dunnock, so would be interested too, to know if
> that is likely.


Yes that was what we saw.

It seemed to have a longer slimmer body than a sparrow, and maybe a longer tail, and definitely a longer narrower beak.

It was sort of pale greyish-brown, but with sparrow-like markings in some places.

But the pictures I've looked up of dunnocks don't look exactly like the one we saw, however apparently their plumage question mark changes towards the breeding season.

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Asset April 13, 09:25PM

I have seen dunnocks in my garden very occasionally and they are fairly common down Greendale, so yes quite possibly what you saw Sue

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by malumbu April 13, 09:47PM

Probably a black cap, males have black caps females brown. They are quite slim and I graceful. I spent ages trying to identify them - I had a couple of pairs on the feeder a few weeks ago. They should migrate but with climate change more are staying over winter.

[www.bto.org]

messageRe: ED Nature Watch
Posted by Sue April 14, 04:12AM

No, it didn't have a cap at all smiling smiley

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