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I?m considering homeschooling my kid for the next few months because he has had to self-isolate for 2 weeks for a positive case, and with winter upon us I can imagine that this is going to happen several more times.


Is there anybody here homeschooling who could give me some idea of the pros and cons, and how homeschooling during lockdown has worked out?


My main worry is the social interaction, but the 2 weeks isolation were so difficult that I?m not sure how homeschooling would be any worse and at least he would be able to go for walks?

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Depending on age of son - did you do homeschooling during the first lockdown?. Many parents were able to cope with this but others struggled especially if they were working from home themselves. My youngest grandchildren were set work by their schools during the summer lockdown. Granddaughter 6 was ok as she enjoys reading, writing and general learning. Her brother, who is more 'physical' found it hard to settle as full of energy - whilst loved doing number work and making things refused to colour/write and was very upset as was not seeing his nursery class friends on a daily basis.


From what I understand - most schools are sending work home to those who are having to isolate.


Costs of private tutors seem to be ?45- ?60 per hour and that was before the March lock down.

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If I've understood your post correctly, your son found completely isolating difficult when a case occurred in his bubble.


School isn't the only reason your son may have to isolate before things return to normal-- any contact could cause it via the tracing system.


Home schooling seems quite extreme as a solution to reduce this possibility. If his class has to isolate again due to someone in the bubble having Covid-19, perhaps next time opt for a private test so that you can still leave the house etc even while he is remote learning to reduce the impact on him. That way, any isolating periods would just be like homeschooling anyhow rather than being totally shut in. This may not be an option because of the cost but ultimately it might be cheaper than investing in all of the books, equipment etc you'd need to properly homeschool.

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motorbird83 Wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------

> If I've understood your post correctly, your son

> found completely isolating difficult when a case

> occurred in his bubble.

>

> School isn't the only reason your son may have to

> isolate before things return to normal-- any

> contact could cause it via the tracing system.

>

> Home schooling seems quite extreme as a solution

> to reduce this possibility. If his class has to

> isolate again due to someone in the bubble having

> Covid-19, perhaps next time opt for a private test

> so that you can still leave the house etc even

> while he is remote learning to reduce the impact

> on him. That way, any isolating periods would

> just be like homeschooling anyhow rather than

> being totally shut in. This may not be an option

> because of the cost but ultimately it might be

> cheaper than investing in all of the books,

> equipment etc you'd need to properly homeschool.



That would be ideal but the school guidance is to stay at home and there is no mention of private testing. I?m not bothered about the schooling - there is more to life than being in the top set! I?m worried about mental health.


Last night Boris Johnson said that there are enough tests for schools to stay open, so does this mean children in the bugle would have the option of getting a test and if they test negative they can go back? If so, why are schools/councils not doing this? Or maybe Boris is sprouting made up nonsense again.


I know of somebody who had 3 lots of isolation periods, that feels pretty extreme to me.

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motorbird83 Wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------

> If I've understood your post correctly, your son

> found completely isolating difficult when a case

> occurred in his bubble.

>

> School isn't the only reason your son may have to

> isolate before things return to normal-- any

> contact could cause it via the tracing system.

>

> Home schooling seems quite extreme as a solution

> to reduce this possibility. If his class has to

> isolate again due to someone in the bubble having

> Covid-19, perhaps next time opt for a private test

> so that you can still leave the house etc even

> while he is remote learning to reduce the impact

> on him. That way, any isolating periods would

> just be like homeschooling anyhow rather than

> being totally shut in. This may not be an option

> because of the cost but ultimately it might be

> cheaper than investing in all of the books,

> equipment etc you'd need to properly homeschool.



By the way, we don?t mix with anybody else, or go to cafes, sjus go outdoor stuff, so school is the only place where he could be ?traced?.

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I think if you took a private test you don't have to isolate -- so you can leave the house to do outdoor stuff-- but the bubble's teaching would still be online as not everyone will have done the private test so most will still need to self isolate.


I'm not sure if everyone is supposed to get a government test as standard now but previously due to capacity constraints that wasn't the advice.

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I'm a teacher at a Lewisham primary. One of my class parents has decided to home school their child due to the pandemic, but ultimately does want them to come back in the long term.


From a legal perspective, it is not counted as a prolonged period of self isolation and we have had to take the child off roll - otherwise it would be continuous unauthorised absence. At the moment we have space and would have the child back, but the place is not reserved and could be offered to anyone else eligible for it in the meantime.

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