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1970s townhouses


Monkey

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Should probably be in another thread but anyway..


Spent much time in these though never actually lived in one. Perhaps it was chance not to have heard a peep from neighbouring houses. The original party walls differ from build to build and I think many have an added internal layer. Wonder whether the common natures of the residents tends to peace and quiet as well.

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We lived in one (behind Horniman Museum)a few years ago and are big fans of them. Flexible accommodation, lots of storage (I think, certainly compared to new builds and even better than the 30s semis - which tend to only have an understairs cupboard), easy to maintain/level rear gardens (we weren't/aren't big gardeners, usually off street parking and don't recall having any problem with noise from the neighbours - with a young family (like ours at the time) on one side and an elderly couple on the other.
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Monkey Wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------

> I?ve got my eyes on a 1970s townhouse in Sydenham.

> Looking for feedback on what it?s like living in

> one of those in terms of the space but also noise

> from neighbours. The walls seem pretty thin. Thank

> you.


We live in a 1960's one near the Horniman Museum and have done for 10 years.

We moved here having previously lived in a trad Victorian terrace house.

Big fans of these houses.

They have much better sound insulation than our victorian terrace where we could clearly hear the neighbours and their children, although we are in a terrace we really get no noise from either side coming through the walls.

Lots of natural light which is a real bonus after the victorian,

Our living/dining room runs depth of house so about 30ft deep by about 17ft wide, bedrooms are all large doubles bar one which in our case we use as a study.

lots of storage, including loft and garage (too narrow for modern cars) and off street parking.

Those are pro's.

only cons I can think of are that we have a small kitchen-big enough to cook in but we eat at one end of the open plan living/dining room.

Neighbours have actually made alterations to make the kitchen more integrated into the living space and opens it up,

others have opened up the ground floor into a kitchen/dining area so if you have the funds the small (almost galley style but wide enough that we have cupboards on both sides so not tiny) kitchen can be rectified.

I'd highly recommend these houses and think they are very undervalued for the amount of space and natural light you get.

around 700k-820k for over 1200 sq ft compared to over a million for a victorian terrace.

good luck with your move.

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I really like these houses! Such a refreshing change from the traditional Victorian terrace layout. My brother lives in one. However, it's impossible for anyone with very limited mobility to come to stay so not great if you have elderly parents. At least in a 2 storey house with loo on the ground floor an older relative only has to get up and down the stairs once a day.
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tomskip Wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------

> I really like these houses! Such a refreshing

> change from the traditional Victorian terrace

> layout. My brother lives in one. However, it's

> impossible for anyone with very limited mobility

> to come to stay so not great if you have elderly

> parents. At least in a 2 storey house with loo on

> the ground floor an older relative only has to get

> up and down the stairs once a day.


To be honest this depends on the house, as ours has a downstairs loo and back bedroom/study as well as utility with sink, some neighbours have downstairs shower rooms too.

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