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Emergency Bag, what would be in yours?


bonniebird

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With the 2 recent fires in Camberwell and Peckham, is it a good idea to keep a breifcase size bag or small holdall by your bed with important bits and pieces in it? Some of the people have nothing, only what they stood in. Is it a good idea and what would you pack?


This is a serious question :)

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Here's a list from an American website (Flylady). Of course, this presupposes you have a little time to grab things. Obviously, in case of dire emergency, just get people out:


1. PEOPLE: Have a plan for getting out of the house and make sure everyone knows it. Have an emergency bag of food and water for your family. Include wholesome snacks and treats for the children: dried fruit, nuts, peanut butter, crackers and granola bars.


2. PETS: Keep pet carriers and leashes readily available to lead pets to safety. Also take pet food with you.


3. PICTURES: Keep negatives or CDs of pictures in a lock box or at a family member's home. Have picture albums in one place ready to grab and go at a moments notice.


4. PAPERS: Have all your important papers in a lock box at a bank and only keep copies at the house. This keeps you from panicking. If you have them at home then put them in a folder that you can easily grab if you have to move fast. Color code it so you can find it!


5. PRESCRIPTIONS: Take your medications with you. Don't forget the ones that have to be refrigerated like insulin. Have small ice chest and cold packs readily accessible to pack and go. If you have babies; remember their formula or medications.


6. PURSES and PETRO: This is where you keep your identification, credit cards and cash. Keep a stash of cash for emergencies and grab it. You may not be able to use an ATM in the event of a power outage. Make sure your car always has a half a tank of gas.


7. PROPER CLOTHES and COMFORT ITEMS: According to the weather conditions; gather up a change of clothes along with outer clothing: coats, rain gear, boots, gloves and hats. If you have babies remember diapers. Remember to grab your children's favorite blanket, stuffed animal or toy. A game or a deck of cards could keep them occupied and calm too.


8. PLANNER/CALENDAR/CONTROL JOURNAL: These documents have all the information you will need from phone numbers, insurance numbers and important dates. They are small and filled with things you don't have to try to remember.


9. PERSONAL PROTECTION: Many of us still have that time of the month. Be sure and grab a box of your preferred protection. It may be hard to find if you have been evacuated. Stress can cause our bodies to do strange things too. So be prepared. Take medication for cramps too.


10. PHONES, RADIOS, FUEL FOR THE CAR: Many of us have cell phones now. Always keep them charged up and have a charger in the car or an extra battery. They may not work in the event of power outages, but then they might. Know which local radio station has emergency bulletins. Keep your battery powered radio tuned to that local station and have plenty of batteries for it. Also keep a old type regular phone that does not operate with electricity. GAS PUMPS don't work without power

either. You can't leave if your car is on empty. So keep your car fuel tank topped off when it hits a half of tank. This way you will have gas to drive at least a couple of hours. Evacuation routes are usually

bumper to bumper traffic. Having a tank filled will keep you less stressed.

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Smoke inhalation can kill you in 2-3 minutes: I'm not sure stopping for ones filofax and a bumper bag of pedigree chum is especially sensible. You can get strongboxes that are fireproof that you can stash legal bumf etc in, and then they don't need to come with you but will still survive a fire, as, hopefully, will you. We're pretty fortunate that all of the doors in our place are fire doors, so even if our kitchen was ablaze the wedding photos would hopefully survive.



Trainers and a warm jumper live next to the bed (but not between me and the door), glasses and mobile on the bedside table. Capable of carrying unconscious wife if needed. Cats bolt out the cat flap if the alarm goes off from burnt toast, they'll look after themselves. Insurance details in mobile.

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Agreed on the disaster prone area version: I think the lake district and tewksbury might consider something similar. My emergency plan is based largely on friends, family and neighbours helping out for the few days following - if the whole town has been swept away i'd imagine slightly more subtantial prep would be a good idea.


The same probably applies to if you have young children: reloading the nappy bag and adding some warm mini-kit would make those horrendous few hours a little easier to manage, i should think.

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*Shouts "Fire Drill!" and feigns unconsciousness*


I'm a bit neurotic about fire (no, honestly, I know it's hard to believe, but I can be a bit neurotic) and have always had a fire plan wherever I live. My plan has only ever involved people though. I'm not underestimating the distress of losing irreplaceable items, but things, however financially or emotionally valuable, are just things. If the people are safely out everything else can be fixed later.

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I was thinking, I have 2 dogs that sleep in the bedroom and when we go to bed I take their collars off, their leads and collars are kept upstairs. If there was a fire and they were panicking, a lead and collar would come in handy. Then was thinking passports stuff like that, just stuff of real importance, I'm in the process of scanning photos and will put them on disc, but they would be in a fire proof box.


Thanks for all the replies so far, its food for thought and is putting things into perspective :)

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Can I also suggest on this thread people invest in a carbon monoxide alarm too in case their gas fires are not healthy?

I agree with much of the above - I have my mobile phone next to the bed and whilst pretty much everything is in my laptop, my bag is also next to the bed which includes everything from medication to purse and cards and appt diary.


I may start a new thread re first aid kits but I have one on my motorcycle in one of the panniers. Get trained in first aid, people!

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I have been in a house fire & inhaled the smoke & ended up in hospital for it. Luckily no one was badly hurt but the weird thing I do remember is seeing how a ball of flame moves so fast as it rolls up the wall and across the ceiling and back down the other side. Also when I came out I was amazed how much smoke I coughed out, like a dragon


Getting out alive is as good as you can wish for, though I generally have my Eastpack holding a spare change of clothes and that's always by the door


My laptop is easy to grab so I'd give that a go



DO have smoke detectors, the ones with a Co2 sensor detect a change in the air just before combustion takes place




W**F

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I can't tell you all just how much my heart sings reading your posts above. Well done everyone and keep safe for Christmas - check your smoke alarms and stock up on 9v batteries (most run on these). Switch off and unplug your Christmas lights before retiring for the night. Use candles sensibly and avoid putting tea-lights on surfaces that can burn (plastic, wood etc). If you need any more advice or practical help then PM me.


Fireman Brum.



I'm growing a mo for prostate cancer research.... http://uk.movember.com/mospace/124675/index/page/2

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Good list Peckhamgatecrasher, usually each Londom borough will have on their web site a section called emergency planning/business continuity which will provide further information for residents. It would even be worthwhile to have some informal arrangements with friends or family that in the event of an unforeseen incident, you have alternative acomodation to go too. Initially the Emergency Planning Officer (theres at least one in each borough) will co-ordinate things such as accomodation with hotels, but having your own plans also helps ease this. Hope this also helps as a pointer


PRIOR PREPARATION PREVENTS POOR PERFORMANCE

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Yes woof it was a bit draughty around the crotch but well worth the discomfort - it's all for a good cause!



woofmarkthedog Wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------

> brum Wrote:

>

> > Fireman Brum.

> >

> >

> > I'm growing a mo for prostate cancer

> research....

> >

> http://uk.movember.com/mospace/124675/index/page/2

>

>

> __________________________________________________

> ________

>

> Oh...

>

> Bit chilly that "outfit" for the time of year, no

> ?

>

>

> W**F

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