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Smaller sized Primary school


dagii

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Hello.


My son has high functioning autism (at least that was paediatric team thought, we don't have any clear diagnosis yet, and seems with C-19 it will be while till we get seen). He is going to mainstream school at the moment (very large school) and I feel that he is struggling more and more. He hates everything about school, he says kids does not play with him, he sits alone in class and overall he is really not happy to go school. I do believe that there must be some smaller schools with teachers who are more involved with all the children not just the 'good' kids.


Is there?!


I would love to transfer him coming September. He is in year 2 at the moment.


And I don't think school is bad or anything cause school has been brilliant with my eldest (who is keen to learn and is very easy going), but with my second child school has been slightly neglecting him.


Thank you for any advice.

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Perhaps it?s less the size of the school than the culture of the school and efficiency of the the SENCO team that matters? No personal experience I?m afraid but my kids are at a 2-form entry school which seems to have great inclusive SENCO approach. My kids are in year 2 and reception and each class in those year groups has at least one child with autism and one to one TA support. Meanwhile I know the story is v different at another local school where children with any kind of additional needs are actively managed out. Both schools outstanding on paper.
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I would agree with Monniemae, in a one form entry school the same number of additional 'jobs' are shared between fewer people. I th8ink it is more about the school culture and I would check in with the class teacher, SENDco and learning mentor and talk with them about how your son feels about school. The learning mentor can set up a weekly group session with some other children to help him build friendships. A pair of ear defenders might make him feel more settled in class, and perhaps a lunchtime club where he can get involved in activities so he is less on his own. If they cannot provide these simple things, find a school which can.
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I?ve been there. Best advice, run! state schools are over crowded locally. There are more kids in mainstream than they can manage. No money for SEND and teachers are burnt out and managed out. If he can manage mainstream learning, it might be best to find a small local private school with smaller class sizes. He will thrive. Other options is homeschool and when things open up a bit more sign him up to lots of activities with his peers around his interests.
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SoylentGreen - yes, been corporating with school since he started 4 years ago, but really nothing has been changed. They response is - he is difficult child and they can't deal with him, also h he is put to sit alone in class, without additional support teacher, because of no enough funding in school. When I asked about playtime at lunch he just says kids don't play with him even though he wants to play It and football with them.


Homeschooling is the thing we really thinking about now, cause unfortunately can't afford go private.


But still hoping there is some smaller sized school in Southwark 😅

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Please don?t think that a private school will automatically be a better option than state. I made that mistake and my son has paid dearly for it with some very upsetting experiences and the development of an anxiety disorder. (It was a pre-prep so at least it won?t be somewhere you?re considering.)


He is now at Dulwich Hamlet Juniors which isn?t small but it is nurturing and caring. He has really come on and is leaving those early bad experiences in the past. The staff are the most important thing, and the more there are, the less likely it is that they will be stretched thinly. More children also means more experience with SEN, generally speaking.

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