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..ok so we have a tiny baby-sized break through in ongoing sleep saga.


Problem - it involves putting baby snowboarder to sleep on his tummy. It got to the stage that I can get him back to sleep after multiple wakes, but as soon as put down in cot he would wake. After about 15 tries one night I put him on his tummy in desperation, and he stayed there and slept for 3 hrs. I know about all the risks. I'm in a horrid dilemma between needing sleep for him as much as myself and thinking he might die and it will be my fault. Hes 7 months old....but can't roll back by himself.


SO - does anyone know when all these awful risks of SIDS reduce? Is there an age bracket? He's in a grobag so no blanket worries. Am I doing a terrible thing? Worry..worry..

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..ok so we have a tiny baby-sized break through in ongoing sleep saga.


Problem - it involves putting baby snowboarder to sleep on his tummy. It got to the stage that I can get him back to sleep after multiple wakes, but as soon as put down in cot he would wake. After about 15 tries one night I put him on his tummy in desperation, and he stayed there and slept for 3 hrs. I know about all the risks. I'm in a horrid dilemma between needing sleep for him as much as myself and thinking he might die and it will be my fault. Hes 7 months old....but can't roll back by himself.


SO - does anyone know when all these awful risks of SIDS reduce? Is there an age bracket? He's in a grobag so no blanket worries. Am I doing a terrible thing? Worry..worry..

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The breakthrough in my daughter's sleep came when she figured out how to roll (quite early in the scheme of things, about 3.5 months) and started sleeping on her tummy. From birth it was obvious she wasn't comfortable sleeping on her back, so I used to sort of wedge her onto her side which helped, but it was when she started sleeping on her front that her sleep became more reliable.


It sounds like you're doing everything you can to make sure he's safe, and if it means he's sleeping and you're happier I think that can only be a good thing.


P x

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The breakthrough in my daughter's sleep came when she figured out how to roll (quite early in the scheme of things, about 3.5 months) and started sleeping on her tummy. From birth it was obvious she wasn't comfortable sleeping on her back, so I used to sort of wedge her onto her side which helped, but it was when she started sleeping on her front that her sleep became more reliable.


It sounds like you're doing everything you can to make sure he's safe, and if it means he's sleeping and you're happier I think that can only be a good thing.


P x

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Hi snowboarder, as soon as MiniKatsu could turn over onto his front (about 4 months, I think) he would never sleep on his back again. We would put him on his back and when we checked him later, he would be on his front with his face planted in the mattress. We would turn his head to the side without waking him up. It was scary at the time, and we spent a couple of days trying to turn him over but soon gave up. He never, ever sleeps on his back now (9 months).Please don't worry too much, I think the danger period is 2-4 months as Fuschia has said. Enjoy your rest!
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Hi snowboarder, as soon as MiniKatsu could turn over onto his front (about 4 months, I think) he would never sleep on his back again. We would put him on his back and when we checked him later, he would be on his front with his face planted in the mattress. We would turn his head to the side without waking him up. It was scary at the time, and we spent a couple of days trying to turn him over but soon gave up. He never, ever sleeps on his back now (9 months).Please don't worry too much, I think the danger period is 2-4 months as Fuschia has said. Enjoy your rest!
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Hi C.....all I can say is that in the past in discussion with midwives and other health professionals I have more than once heard stories of very young babies that would ONLY settle on their tummys, and professional advice in that instance seems to be that you sometimes have to go with it, because what else can you do (actually one midwife had to let her own baby sleep on his tummy because he wouldn't settle otherwise).


I think at the age Baby Snowboarder is the risks are minimal. If really worried maybe you could either sleep in the same room for a few nights, or see if anyone on here has one of those mat things that the baby sleeps on that monitors breathing and heart rate etc. I'm sure after a few weeks you would feel reassured, and he may start to roll anyway. I think you both need to start to get some sleep.


Both my girls also slept on their fronts as soon as they were able - I put baby C on her back now and she turns over immediately every time.


Molly

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Hi C.....all I can say is that in the past in discussion with midwives and other health professionals I have more than once heard stories of very young babies that would ONLY settle on their tummys, and professional advice in that instance seems to be that you sometimes have to go with it, because what else can you do (actually one midwife had to let her own baby sleep on his tummy because he wouldn't settle otherwise).


I think at the age Baby Snowboarder is the risks are minimal. If really worried maybe you could either sleep in the same room for a few nights, or see if anyone on here has one of those mat things that the baby sleeps on that monitors breathing and heart rate etc. I'm sure after a few weeks you would feel reassured, and he may start to roll anyway. I think you both need to start to get some sleep.


Both my girls also slept on their fronts as soon as they were able - I put baby C on her back now and she turns over immediately every time.


Molly

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My mother always gleefully tells me that when my brother and I were newborn babies, the medical advice was to put us to sleep in a warm room, face-down, covered in blankets AND a duvet! Oh, and of course my mum smoked like a chimney, as so many people did in those days. Needless to say, my brother and I both survived, as did the vast majority of our generation. That's not to undermine your natural worry, but just to reassure you that babies are generally hardy little souls. As Fuschia says, by 7 months you're well past the major risk age for SIDS (I'm sure your baby can lift his head slightly, even if he can't roll over) and as long as you're not chain-smoking cigarettes over him in a boiling hot room I'm sure he'll be fine. As an adult I still always sleep on my tummy - by far the most comfortable way to get to sleep, even if you do wake up with a cricked neck in the morning! So I'd say go for it and personally I wouldn't go near those monitors that check the heart rate - from what I've heard of them from friends your baby will sleep through blissfully but you'll be up every ten minutes every time the damn bleeper goes off for no reason.
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My mother always gleefully tells me that when my brother and I were newborn babies, the medical advice was to put us to sleep in a warm room, face-down, covered in blankets AND a duvet! Oh, and of course my mum smoked like a chimney, as so many people did in those days. Needless to say, my brother and I both survived, as did the vast majority of our generation. That's not to undermine your natural worry, but just to reassure you that babies are generally hardy little souls. As Fuschia says, by 7 months you're well past the major risk age for SIDS (I'm sure your baby can lift his head slightly, even if he can't roll over) and as long as you're not chain-smoking cigarettes over him in a boiling hot room I'm sure he'll be fine. As an adult I still always sleep on my tummy - by far the most comfortable way to get to sleep, even if you do wake up with a cricked neck in the morning! So I'd say go for it and personally I wouldn't go near those monitors that check the heart rate - from what I've heard of them from friends your baby will sleep through blissfully but you'll be up every ten minutes every time the damn bleeper goes off for no reason.
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I have to say, we had one of those monitors and It was a godsend.I think I would have been in and out of her room all the time if I hadnt know it was there.


Everyone is different but for me it was peace of mind. Right from the first night it was nice just looking across when I opened my eyes to see the light flashing( our flashed a small led everytime it felt a breath).


In the year and a half that we used it( I know far too long-just got into the habit of turning it on )it only went off 3 times twice was when we were away on holiday and she was in the travel cot,

as this is bigger she had moved around and was off the pad, the other time I think she had actually stopped breathing- cant be sure for def but when I went in and lifted her,she was very floppy and then she took a huge gasping breath and started to cry.


The reason we bought it was because my cousins little one stopped breathing about 6 times in the first 8 months and he was told that he just kept forgetting to breath. The monitor was given to them by the hosp and was told that if he did keep forgetting to breath the noise of the alarm going off would startle him into breathing. When we got pregnant my cousin recommended getting one, Im really glad I did as who know maybe E is still here because I heard that alarm going off.


You can get them from argos if you are considering them then get one and have a try, you can always take it back if its not for you.

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I have to say, we had one of those monitors and It was a godsend.I think I would have been in and out of her room all the time if I hadnt know it was there.


Everyone is different but for me it was peace of mind. Right from the first night it was nice just looking across when I opened my eyes to see the light flashing( our flashed a small led everytime it felt a breath).


In the year and a half that we used it( I know far too long-just got into the habit of turning it on )it only went off 3 times twice was when we were away on holiday and she was in the travel cot,

as this is bigger she had moved around and was off the pad, the other time I think she had actually stopped breathing- cant be sure for def but when I went in and lifted her,she was very floppy and then she took a huge gasping breath and started to cry.


The reason we bought it was because my cousins little one stopped breathing about 6 times in the first 8 months and he was told that he just kept forgetting to breath. The monitor was given to them by the hosp and was told that if he did keep forgetting to breath the noise of the alarm going off would startle him into breathing. When we got pregnant my cousin recommended getting one, Im really glad I did as who know maybe E is still here because I heard that alarm going off.


You can get them from argos if you are considering them then get one and have a try, you can always take it back if its not for you.

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My son is almost 5 months and he sleeps on his tummy - I felt very bad for ages and questioned myself the entire time - but bottom line is that he and I both needed sleep and he sleeps better on his tummy (this is part of the problem I've been told - that they sleep deeply so they wouldn't be able to wake themselves if something was to go wrong ..?!?!) Of a class of 6 NCT babies 2 of us have babies that sleep on their tummies.

I will also add (before people raise their eyebrows at me ;-) that I did try what I could do to settle him on his back but due to chest problems his breathing became noisy and restricted, he also had a squashed head when he was born (it looked like an egg!) so he was uncomfortable I found so actually I had no choice .. but its been a blessing as my son sleeps really well and so do I.

I also thought about one of those pad things .. but I've already got a baby monitor and I decided to stop there otherwise I think I would have consumed myself in things to make my baby safe and probably never stopped worrying ..


Did anyone see the recent discussion on BBC regarding cot death? I'd still like to know of those unfortunate babies - how many were sleeping in a well circulated room with a good mattress and a smoke free home. Many of them seemed to be from co sleeping on a couch where alcohol was present too weren't they? (But don't quote me on that as I'm not 100% I just wasn't listening properly.)

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My son is almost 5 months and he sleeps on his tummy - I felt very bad for ages and questioned myself the entire time - but bottom line is that he and I both needed sleep and he sleeps better on his tummy (this is part of the problem I've been told - that they sleep deeply so they wouldn't be able to wake themselves if something was to go wrong ..?!?!) Of a class of 6 NCT babies 2 of us have babies that sleep on their tummies.

I will also add (before people raise their eyebrows at me ;-) that I did try what I could do to settle him on his back but due to chest problems his breathing became noisy and restricted, he also had a squashed head when he was born (it looked like an egg!) so he was uncomfortable I found so actually I had no choice .. but its been a blessing as my son sleeps really well and so do I.

I also thought about one of those pad things .. but I've already got a baby monitor and I decided to stop there otherwise I think I would have consumed myself in things to make my baby safe and probably never stopped worrying ..


Did anyone see the recent discussion on BBC regarding cot death? I'd still like to know of those unfortunate babies - how many were sleeping in a well circulated room with a good mattress and a smoke free home. Many of them seemed to be from co sleeping on a couch where alcohol was present too weren't they? (But don't quote me on that as I'm not 100% I just wasn't listening properly.)

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I didn't see the programme, but saw some of the spin-off articles. The message seems to be never, never fall asleep with your baby on a sofa, and never co-sleep when anyone in the bed has been drinking.


snowboarder, hope this is the start of something good for you! I'm sure he'll be rolling soon anyway. The minute my son was able to roll he started sleeping on his front, and he still seems to prefer it, though we often find him in the oddest of positions, jammed into a corner of his cot or halfway up a side lying on his teddy, and still beatifically asleep.

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I didn't see the programme, but saw some of the spin-off articles. The message seems to be never, never fall asleep with your baby on a sofa, and never co-sleep when anyone in the bed has been drinking.


snowboarder, hope this is the start of something good for you! I'm sure he'll be rolling soon anyway. The minute my son was able to roll he started sleeping on his front, and he still seems to prefer it, though we often find him in the oddest of positions, jammed into a corner of his cot or halfway up a side lying on his teddy, and still beatifically asleep.

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Hi Snowboarder.If you are not doing this already try putting your son on his front a lot during the day on a rug or the carpet. He will soon learn to roll anyway but it might speed it up and make you feel easier. A friend advised me to do it when my son was quite young (I never thought to do it to be honest) and he really loved it.
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redjam Wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------

> My mother always gleefully tells me that when my

> brother and I were newborn babies, the medical

> advice was to put us to sleep in a warm room,

> face-down, covered in blankets AND a duvet! Oh,

> and of course my mum smoked like a chimney, as so

> many people did in those days. Needless to say,

> my brother and I both survived, as did the vast

> majority of our generation.


GAAAAAHHHHHHHHH!


The Back to Sleep campaign has been the most succesful public health campaign ever, in this country and around the world. You and your siblings, and the rest of us here were the lucky ones.

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